When convenience meets surveillance: AI at the corner store

Jacksons Food Stores at South 38th Street and Pacific Avenue in Tacoma is testing facial recognition technology to prevent theft at its store. Some customers expressed concern that the store doesn’t have a sign informing patrons of the technology. (Melissa Hellmann / The Seattle Times)
Jacksons Food Stores at South 38th Street and Pacific Avenue in Tacoma is testing facial recognition technology to prevent theft at its store. Some customers expressed concern that the store doesn't have a sign informing patrons of the technology. (Melissa Hellmann / The Seattle Times)

At some convenience stores, an A.I. system may bar the door if you look like the suspected criminals in its database, or if you're wearing a mask. That's part of the growing use of facial recognition and video analytics, a trend that has some experts concerned about spreading surveillance of daily life.

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