Boeing 737 MAX

As Boeing’s 737 MAX nears a return to service, will flyers return to it?

This Boeing 737 MAX was  among 192 stored as of Wednesday at Grant County International Airport in Moses Lake. Called a ghost plane or whitetail, this one is painted white because the airline it was built for no longer wants it. It will be painted with a new livery after the plane is ungrounded and Boeing secures a customer. Next month, the FAA is expected to clear the MAX to fly passengers again. (Mike Siegel / The Seattle Times)
This Boeing 737 MAX was among 192 stored as of Wednesday at Grant County International Airport in Moses Lake. Called a ghost plane or whitetail, this one is painted white because the airline it was built for no longer wants it. It will be painted with a new livery after the plane is ungrounded and Boeing secures a customer. Next month, the FAA is expected to clear the MAX to fly passengers again. (Mike Siegel / The Seattle Times)

Grounded worldwide after two crashes killed 346 people, Boeing’s 737 MAX faces a potential consumer backlash as its return to flight looms closer. The fate of the MAX — along with Boeing’s reputation — largely depends on winning over nervous passengers who may seek to avoid flights on the troubled aircraft.

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