The hijinks, as Washington State coach Mike Leach calls them, were plentiful in the days of 16-millimeter film exchange. First, a graduate assistant...

Share story

PULLMAN — The hijinks, as Washington State coach Mike Leach calls them, were plentiful in the days of 16-millimeter film exchange.

First, a graduate assistant had to splice the thing up, drive the reel — or later, the VHS tape — to the airport and get it on the earliest flight to the location of that week’s opponent.

And once it arrived, there were no guarantees it would be in one piece.

“Film would be missing,” Leach said. “Sometimes they would strategically make sure it was really static-y when it came in. There would always be the somebody sent it late — ‘Oh, well, it didn’t make it on the plane.’ So you’re getting ready for a game and you get your film two days later and they’ve already had theirs, that type of deal.”

Not anymore. Not for WSU and not for a bevy of other Division I teams, most of which handle their film study through an online service called Hudl that seeks to diminish the stress so famously associated with film exchange.

Game videos are exchanged simultaneously across the conference on Sunday. Instead of players trekking into the football office to watch film together, they can do it on their own at any time — on their laptop, iPad, iPhone or Android device.

“There’s no excuse for not watching film by yourself,” WSU safety Deone Bucannon said. “Because you can do it whenever you want. It really helps you.”