Husky Stadium is closing in on the year’s first sellout for what has to be the program’s most important home game since the 2000 Rose Bowl season.

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The stage is theirs.

The premier game of the Pac-12 Conference season has arrived, as planned: No. 7 Stanford vs. No. 10 Washington. Friday night. Husky Stadium. Primetime national audience.

The Pac-12 had insisted on the 6 o’clock kickoff time. It will be a nightmare for your commute — intolerable as it already is, it’s about to get worse — but the idea is to give East Coast viewers a prime opportunity to watch Stanford star Christian McCaffrey, who was stiff-armed in his run for the Heisman Trophy last year.

It’s also a prime opportunity for the Huskies (4-0, 1-0 Pac-12) to steal the spotlight away from McCaffrey and the Cardinal (3-0, 2-0) — and, more importantly, wrestle away control of the Pac-12 North from the team that has won three of the last four conference championships.

Husky Stadium is closing in on the year’s first sellout for what has to be the program’s most important home game since the 2000 Rose Bowl season.

“This,” UW coach Chris Petersen said, “could be college football at its finest.”

The stage is new for the Huskies, 7-6 a year ago with the youngest offense in school history. Petersen, in his third season at UW, now has the Huskies back in the top 10 for the first time in 15 years.

“I was not happy to see who Washington hired up there (in December 2013) because I knew what would happen,” Stanford coach David Shaw said. “I knew he’d be successful up there.”

The Huskies proved something in their first road game last Saturday, surviving a surprising test from Arizona to win in overtime, 35-28.

Stanford’s had success, a lot of it, and they appear in their element in the most stressful moments — tight game, fourth quarter, on the road. Last Saturday, for instance: Stanford hadn’t scored a touchdown all game … until the final 24 seconds, when they drove 70 yards to take the lead against UCLA in the Rose Bowl.

“We have a lot of guys on our team who have played in big games — Pac-12 championship games, Rose Bowl games. We’ve been to a lot of big games, so our guys have some experience,” Shaw said. “They’ve learned to lean on each other; they trust our process. … We’re not panicked or frantic by any stretch.”

Physical and fundamentally sound, Stanford has won playing the brand of football Petersen has said he’s trying to replicate here in Seattle. Stanford ranks first in the Pac-12 in scoring defense (12.0) and UW ranks second (14.5).

The Huskies — playing without the injured Browning — were bullied in a 31-14 loss at Stanford last year.

“Good football team,” Petersen said of Stanford after that game. “Down the road, we’ll be a good football team. But not tonight”

The Huskies have had a good start to the season. Are they good enough to take down Stanford?

They’ll have a Friday night spotlight to show if they are.