Sabrina Ionescu, named the MVP of the McDonald’s All-America game, is expected to choose between UW and Oregon this month. She would be the highest-ranked recruit to ever join the UW women’s basketball program.

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Washington’s historic run to the women’s Final Four caught the eye of at least one national recruit.

Five-star guard Sabrina Ionescu, named the MVP of the McDonald’s All-America game in March, will choose between UW and Oregon later this month. The last day for 2016 recruits to sign a letter of intent is May 18.

ESPN rates Ionescu, a 6-foot guard out of Miramonte High in Orinda, Calif., as the No. 4 overall recruit for the Class of 2016. Her twin brother, Eddy, plans to walk-on to the Oregon men’s basketball team.

The Huskies emerged late in the recruiting process — Ionescu at one point listed Cal, Oregon, Oregon State and Texas as her four finalists — but appear now to be serious suitors. She would be the highest-ranked recruit to ever join the UW women’s basketball program.

“Washington gave me my space and continued to recruit me during my entire process,” Ionescu told the Oregon Daily Emerald. “When it became clear that OSU and Cal were out, it was just natural that Washington and Oregon were left.”

Ionescu averaged 25.9 points, 8.8 assists, 7.3 rebounds and 4.5 steals at Miramonte as a senior and led her school to a 119-10 record over four years. At the McDonald’s All-America game on March 30, she scored 25 points and had 10 rebounds en route to earning the game’s MVP honors.

From ESPN:

If you had any doubts about whether Ionescu was going to be a game-changer, her performance Wednesday night erased them. Ionescu took charge for the West, at one point even diagramming a play in the huddle, and willed her team to victory with a record-setting 25 points as well as 10 rebounds and three assists. By the way, she also received the sportsmanship award at halftime and the MVP after the final buzzer. Could you ask for anything more?

It is unusual for a high-profile recruit to wait so long to decide on a college destination, but Ionescu has said he wanted to take her time.

“I’m taking my own path and not letting anyone alter it,” Ionescu told USA Today earlier this year. “I tried to get it done (in November’s early signing period) to not have to deal with all the questions and everyone asking me every day. But I wanted to let it play out and let the true colors of the schools play out. I wanted to see how the coaches interact with me after a win and after a loss.”