Seattle Storm
vs. Las Vegas Aces

4 p.m. | IMG Academy | Bradenton, Florida

TV: ESPN2

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(Illustration by Rich Boudet / The Seattle Times)
Storm-Aces

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Live updates: Storm vs. Aces

FINAL: Storm 93, Aces 80

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Stewart taking over

Another record for Bird

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Stewie time

Third-quarter recap

Seattle, which led by 19 points, had a 65-49 advantage and looked to be on the verge of blowing out Las Vegas before the Aces seized momentum. The Storm was outscored 27-12 in the third while connecting on just 4 of 18 field goals. Seattle leads 69-67 at the start of the fourth. 

—Percy Allen

End of third: Storm 69, Aces 67

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Aces making a run

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Sue Bird sets WNBA Finals assists record

Halftime thoughts

The Storm trailed 34-33 and took over the game with an 18-0 run. Seattle is continuously beating Las Vegas down the court on missed baskets. Bird is pushing the pace at every opportunity and tossing long passes for layups. She has 10 assists, which is one shy of a WNBA Finals single-game record. Loyd is dropping daggers from every spot on the court. She’s drained 8 of 11 shots for 19 points. Stewart hasn’t been too shabby, either, while connecting on 7 of 10 shots for 16. In her first WNBA Finals appearance, Las Vegas star A’ja Wilson, the 2020 WNBA MVP, has nine points on 3-for-12 shooting. Angel McCoughtry (12 points) is keeping the Aces afloat while hitting 4 of 4 three-pointers.

—Percy Allen
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Halftime: Storm 57, Aces 40

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10 assists for Sue Bird

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First-quarter recap

Lots of action at the start. The Storm fell into an 8-0 hole before going on a 15-3 run to go ahead 15-11. Sue Bird dished six assists on Seattle’s first seven field goals. The Storm’s stars led the way. Breanna Stewart scored eight points and Jewell Loyd had seven. Seattle also received a huge lift off the bench from Epiphanny Prince, who has eight points. Las Vegas doesn’t take a lot of three-pointers, but the Aces are 4 of 6 behind the arc.

—Percy Allen

End of first: Storm 23, Aces 21

Bird dishing early

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Take an interactive look through Sue Bird's 17-year career with Storm

Sue Bird has already cemented her legacy as one of the greatest WNBA players of all time and a Seattle sports icon — and she's not done yet. As Bird and the Storm get set for the Finals, take a look back at Bird’s historic career in Seattle.

Explore our interactive here.

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Fourth championship would cap an exhilarating, and exhausting, Storm season inside the WNBA bubble

The Storm entered the WNBA bubble — or “wubble” as it affectionately came to be known by the players — July 6. And now, nearly three months later, they are aiming to finally leave in a few days with the organization’s fourth championship trophy in tow.

“We’re at the point now, we can see the end of the tunnel,” coach Gary Kloppenburg said. “If we can come out and prepare, really come out hard, get these guys, then we can finish it up and everybody can go home. That’s some extra motivation, I think, for our players.”

Life ensconced at the IMG Academy in Bradenton, Florida, will be an experience none of the Storm players will ever forget, no matter the outcome of their best-of-five WNBA Finals with the Las Vegas Aces.

Read more here.

—Larry Stone

Here’s what you need to know about the WNBA Finals matchup

Starting lineups, Finals schedule, season series and matchups to watch. Here's what you need to know about the WNBA Finals matchup between the Storm and Aces.

Read more here.

—Percy Allen

Like the year 2020, Storm players know nothing will be easy about WNBA Finals matchup with Las Vegas Aces

Bill Laimbeer is something of a contrarian who often zigs when others zag and keeping in line with his personality, the Las Vegas Aces coach had a different take than most about a WNBA Finals matchup against the Storm.

“We’re both similar,” he said. “We have a scoring big. We have another scorer on the team. We move the ball well. We’re back and forth in a flow action (offensively) like they are. We play similar styles of defense.”

On the surface, there’s a lot of truth here.

Read more here.

—Percy Allen