Because it’s been a couple years, here’s a quick refresher course before the Sounders face off against the Whitecaps for the second time in five days to kick off Group F of the 2015-16 Champions League.

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On Wednesday night at B.C. Place in Vancouver, the Sounders will play their first CONCACAF Champions League match since April 2013, when Mexico’s Santos Laguna edged them in the semifinals.

Because it’s been a couple years, here’s a quick refresher course before the Sounders face off against the Whitecaps for the second time in five days to kick off Group F of the 2015-16 Champions League.

Question: Champions League sounds important. Remind me again: Is it important?

Schedule

The Sounders’ CONCACAF Champions League group-stage schedule:

• Wednesday: Sounders at Vancouver, 7 p.m. TV: Fox Sports 1. Radio: KIRO-FM (97.3).

• Aug. 19: Sounders vs. CD Olimpia, 7 p.m., CenturyLink Field.

• Aug. 26: Sounders at CD Olimpia, 7 p.m., Tegucigalpa, Honduras.

• Sept. 23: Sounders vs. Vancouver, 7 p.m., CenturyLink Field.

Answer: That depends on whom you ask.

The MLS office certainly hypes the event as a means to showcase the gains the league has made on Mexico’s Liga MX over the past decade, even though no MLS club has won the regional title. Montreal became a finalist this year, and the Impact was 45 minutes from glory before falling apart in the second half against Club America at Olympic Stadium.

Certain clubs value the competition more than others. Seattle, which qualified for the competition by virtue of its U.S. Open Cup and Supporters’ Shield wins, has made it a priority, usually in the context of the club’s long-term goal of growing its global brand.

As for the players …

“I think the league looks forward to it more than the players do,” Sounders forward Chad Barrett said this week.

Q: So, should fans get excited?

A: Don’t tune out just yet.

Think of the Champions League as a luxury good in MLS. When things are going well, it’s a chance for clubs to flaunt their successes. When a team’s MLS campaign takes a downturn, though, the extra games can be a burden.

Seattle plays eight games in August, and having been drawn into perhaps the toughest group with Vancouver and Honduran power CD Olimpia, the Sounders can’t afford to loaf.

“I think it’s just a balancing act,” Sounders captain Brad Evans said. “You have to look at your current situation and what is most important.”

Situations change. Yes, right now, the Sounders probably would rather focus on MLS play. But come next spring, should they survive Group F, the Sounders might be playing well and could relish the chance to face off against some regional heavyweights.

Q: Wait, next spring?

A: Because the MLS calendar runs contrary to most of the other leagues in the region, the competition runs from August through April, with group stages in the fall and the knockout rounds in the spring. The fact that the biggest games come when MLS is still rubbing its eyes from a winter of hibernation has long been blamed for its lack of Champions League success.

Q: You’re losing me.

A: Yes, the CONCACAF Champions League can sometimes have questionable leadership and suspect refereeing. The structure is awkward, and the best teams usually hold out their top players until late in the knockout rounds.

But furthering the rivalries between MLS and Liga MX clubs for regional domination would be a worthy end for both. And the carrot is an enticing one: a berth in the Club World Cup and a chance to rub shoulders with the biggest clubs in the world.

Facing off against Barcelona, Bayern Munich or Boca Juniors in a competitive setting has long been pointed to as a next frontier for the league.

Q: OK, I’ll give it a shot.

A: That’s the spirit.

Information in this article, originally published Aug. 4, 2015, was corrected Aug. 6, 2015 A previous version of this story incorrectly stated that Montreal was the first MLS team to be a Champions League regional finalist.