The Vikings seemingly had victory in hand as Walsh lined up for a 27-yard field-goal attempt with 26 seconds left. The snap was perfect, the hold was flawed, and Walsh’s kick never stood a chance once it left his foot.

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MINNEAPOLIS — Blair Walsh knew it the instant he kicked the football. Knew his field goal would hook. Knew he would be a playoff goat instead of a playoff hero.

One second he lined up for a winning kick. And then it vanished, gone, poof. A stunning miss wide left.

Just like that. Season over.

The life of a kicker can be a cruel, lonely existence. Walsh hit rock bottom Sunday.

SEAHAWKS 10, VIKINGS 9

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“I’ll take the blame, because I deserve every second of it,” he said.

For the record, Walsh didn’t lose a playoff game by himself. He had help, specifically from the franchise running back, Adrian Peterson, whose fumble-itis cost his team dearly in the postseason again.

The Vikings seemingly had victory in hand as Walsh lined up for a 27-yard field-goal attempt with 26 seconds left.

The snap was perfect, the hold was flawed, and Walsh’s kick never stood a chance once it left his foot.

Seahawks 10, Vikings 9.

“I didn’t come through for us in that moment, and that hurts,” Walsh said.

Walsh waited for a crush of media members to surround him at his locker after the game. He maintained his composure answering questions for more than five minutes but then broke down in tears as teammates stopped to console him.

“He’s stepped up big for us and won games for us in the past,” safety Harrison Smith said. “Not going to abandon him now.”

Some will say Walsh choked in a pressure moment. Some will blame holder Jeff Locke, who did not spin the ball so the football’s laces were facing out. Instead, the laces faced Walsh on the kick, the worst possible setup.

Both were to blame, Walsh bearing ultimate responsibility.

“It’s my fault,” he said. “ … I’m the only one who didn’t do my job.”