Seattle Seahawks (0-0)
vs. Atlanta Falcons (0-0)

10 a.m. | Mercedes-Benz Stadium | Atlanta

TV: FOX | Radio: 710 AM/97.3 FM | Stream: NFL Game Pass

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Live updates: Seahawks at Falcons

Seahawks kick off unusual season with win over Falcons

If 2020 has proven to be a year when you never know what to expect in life, Sunday proved that one thing, at least, remains a constant: Russell Wilson is really, really good at playing quarterback.

Wilson kicked off his ninth season in the NFL with one of the best games of his career, throwing for four touchdowns in leading the Seahawks to a 38-25 win in the regular season opener at Atlanta.

Read more from Bob Condotta here.

—Bob Condotta
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Falcons add garbage-time TD

Seahawks add another TD

After Seahawks three-and-out, Falcons fail on another fourth down

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Falcons respond quickly with wide-open TD

Seahawks tack on FG

Adam Jude's third-quarter impressions

Seahawks tight end Greg Olsen celebrates his touchdown in the end zone against the Falcons on Sunday in Atlanta. (Brynn Anderson / The Associated Press)
Seahawks tight end Greg Olsen celebrates his touchdown in the end zone against the Falcons on Sunday in Atlanta. (Brynn Anderson / The Associated Press)

Third-quarter impressions from the Seahawks’ opener in Atlanta:

Fourth-down surprise

The third-down stretch run for Travis Homer failed miserably, setting up a fourth-and-5 for the Seahawks at the Atlanta 38.

What to do?

Russell Wilson dropped in a perfectly threw deep pass to DK Metcalf along the left sideline for a too-easy 38-yard touchdown midway through the third quarter.

The Falcons left cornerback Isaiah Oliver in one-on-one coverage against Metcalf … and, yeah, that was a mistake.

Metcalf, the second-year receiver, made up for a bad drop earlier in the drive. He rebounded from that to make a nice play on third down — extending the ball over the first-down line while being tackled. Then came his first TD of the season on the fourth-down throw from Wilson.

Russ keeps cookin’

The chef is feeding the whole family today.

Wilson enters the fourth quarter with four touchdown passes — the 11th four-TD game of his career.

After two first-half TD throws to Chris Carson, Wilson added his third to Metcalf and then the fourth to new tight end Greg Olsen late in the third quarter, extending the Seahawks’ lead to 28-12.

Wilson is 23 of 26 for 219 yards with those four TDs. He’s been sacked three times.

Tyler Lockett, by the way, is having a great day too: six catches for 72 yards for Seattle’s No. 1 receiver.

Blair’s flair

Marquise Blair was one of the breakthrough players of training camp for the Seahawks, and his breakthrough carried over into Sunday.

The second-year safety made a heady read on Atlanta’s fake-punt handoff early in the third quarter and knocked the ball away from Sharrod Neasman, forcing a fumble that Seahawks rookie Freddie Swain recovered.

—Adam Jude
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End of third: Seahawks 28, Falcons 12

Seahawks stymie another Falcons fourth-down try

Greg Olsen grabs first TD with Seahawks

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Russell Wilson goes to DK Metcalf for deep TD

Bob Condotta's halftime impressions

Falcons running back Todd Gurley is stopped by Seahawks strong safety Jamal Adams in the first half Sunday in Atlanta. (John Bazemore / The Associated Press)
Falcons running back Todd Gurley is stopped by Seahawks strong safety Jamal Adams in the first half Sunday in Atlanta. (John Bazemore / The Associated Press)

A good start, but...

What a tale of two quarters for the Seattle offense. Two drives for TDs in the first quarter, three drives that netted just 29 yards and ended in three punts in the second. Seattle appeared to have Atlanta off balance early with some misdirection and motions. Atlanta steadied itself after and also was able to get some pressure out of four-man rushes, particularly in the form of tackle Grady Jarrett, who is proving to be a really tough matchup so far for rookie guard Damien Lewis.

Quinton Dunbar looks rusty

Seattle gave up 182 passing yards in the first half. Dunbar started at right cornerback and played all but one series, with Tre Flowers coming in for one series in the second quarter.

Dunbar was on the defending end of a few big Atlanta completions, such as a 19-yarder to Calvin Ridley on a third-and-11 in the first quarter and a 28-yarder to Julio Jones. Dunbar missed much of training camp, so he understandably needed a little time to shake off the rust.

Late field goal takes Seattle off stat mark

The late field goal by Atlanta to make it 14-12 means the Seahawks will not be able to extend their noted streak of going 57-0 when ahead by four or more at halftime.

—Bob Condotta
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HALFTIME | Seahawks 14, Falcons 12

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Jamal Adams making an impact

Lots of pressure early on Russell Wilson

Falcons respond quickly with TD

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Adam Jude's first-quarter impressions

Seahawks quarterback Russell Wilson runs for a first down Sunday against the Falcons in Atlanta. (John Bazemore / The Associated Press)
Seahawks quarterback Russell Wilson runs for a first down Sunday against the Falcons in Atlanta. (John Bazemore / The Associated Press)

Early impressions from the Seahawks’ opener in Atlanta:

Yep, he’s cooking already

Russell Wilson had openly asked the Seahawks to treat the first quarter like the fourth quarter — to create more urgency early in the game.

The Seahawks have done that beautifully so far.

Despite taking a 9-yard sack on Seattle’s first offensive snap, Wilson led two touchdown drives on the Seahawks’ first two possessions — both touchdown passes going to running back Chris Carson.

Wilson started 8 for 8 for 81 yards and a QB rating of 148.4. Oh, and he added a 28-yard run on the second drive — on a triple-option run alongside Tyler Lockett. Wilson is now over 4,000 yards rushing in his career, just the fifth QB in NFL history to achieve that.

What a start.

The Seahawks led 14-3 entering the second quarter and led 14-9 with just over 11 minutes left in the half.

Pay that man

With a flurry of new contract extension for several of the NFL’s top running backs, that inevitably leads to questions with what the Seahawks are going to do with Carson.

A former seventh-round draft pick, Carson will be a free agent after this season. Can the Seahawks really let him go?

Carson was brilliant in the first quarter. In addition to his two TD catches, he had a sensational one-handed grab out of the backfield, then lowered his shoulder to plow into a defensive back to pick up a first down.

Welcome to Seattle, Jamal Adams

The Seahawks paid big to bring Jamal Adams to Seattle.

We’re seeing why.

Adams broke up a Matt Ryan pass intended for Julio Jones early, then had an open-field tackle of Todd Gurley at the line of scrimmage. He’s exactly what this Seattle defense needed.

—Adam Jude

All 22 Seahawks and Falcons players take a knee during the opening kickoff to protest racial injustice

Seahawks strong safety Jamal Adams raises his fist during the national anthem before Seattle’s game Sunday against the Falcons in Atlanta. (John Bazemore / The Associated Press)
Seahawks strong safety Jamal Adams raises his fist during the national anthem before Seattle’s game Sunday against the Falcons in Atlanta. (John Bazemore / The Associated Press)

The Seahawks had said they would keep in-house how they planned to protest before Sunday’s game.

As Seattle’s Jason Myers kicked off to start the game, all 22 players took a knee and the kick was not returned.

Newly-acquired safety Jamal Adams also raised a right fist throughout the national anthem, reminiscent of John Carlos and Tommie Smith at the 1968 Olympics.

Read the full story here.

—Bob Condotta

Seahawks score again

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#analysis

Seahawks take the lead on Russell Wilson's first TD

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Falcons get on the board first

Seahawks players kneel, raise fists during national anthem

Quinton Dunbar and Tre Flowers at right cornerback?

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Seahawks report zero COVID-19 cases

Rookies Alton Robinson, DeeJay Dallas among six Seahawks inactives

DeeJay Dallas. (Bettina Hansen / The Seattle Times)
DeeJay Dallas. (Bettina Hansen / The Seattle Times)

Seattle’s list of six inactive players for Sunday’s game included two rookies who have garnered a lot of hype during camp — end Alton Robinson and running back DeeJay Dallas.

The two were among six players the Seahawks made inactive to get the roster down to the gameday limit of 48.

Others were injured receiver Phillip Dorsett, injured offensive lineman Cedric Ogbuehi, offensive lineman Jamarco Jones, who came down with the flu late in the week, per general manager John Schneider, and recently-acquired linebacker D’Andre Walker.

The Seahawks kept eight defensive linemen active, including recently-signed veteran Damontre Moore. Moore was listed behind Robinson on the depth chart released by the team this week at the rush end LEO position. But Moore has seven years of experience in the NFL and without a chance to see rookies in the preseason, teams may rely a little more on experience early on.

Without Dallas, Seattle has three active tailbacks in Chris Carson, Carlos Hyde and Travis Homer. Homer has some significant special teams roles, including last year serving as the up back, or personal protector, on the punt team.

Dorsett is inactive with a sore foot that had him listed as questionable for the game.

That leaves Seattle with five receivers for the game — Tyler Lockett, DK Metcalf, David Moore, Freddie Swain and Penny Hart, who was signed off the practice squad this week with John Ursua being waived (and eventually re-signed to the practice squad).

Seattle kept eight offensive linemen active which allowed the Seahawks to take advantage of a new NFL rule and have 48 active players overall.

—Bob Condotta

Beyond the Stars: Russell Wilson wanted more superstars for a Seahawks squad sensing Super Bowl possibilities

Russell Wilson set the offseason theme when he said that the Seahawks needed to add more "superstars." The Jamal Adams trade spoke of a front office that feels some sense that the future is now.

Read more from Bob Condotta here.

—Bob Condotta