The Seahawks have been so good for so long that performances like Sunday, in which the other team’s offense totaled 177 yards in the Seahawks’ 24-7 victory, have become routine. Expected, even.

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EAST RUTHERFORD, N.J. — The 46 rushing yards, 134 passing yards and seven points allowed against Eli Manning and his backup receivers? Pretty standard stuff.

And that’s the amazing part.

The Seahawks have been so good for so long that performances like Sunday, in which the other team’s offense totaled 177 yards in the Seahawks’ 24-7 victory, have become routine. Expected, even.

Seahawks 41, Texans 38

 

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“What do you want me to tell you?” Seahawks coach Pete Carroll said. “This is a really good group. We’ve had like three bad plays this year. Really. There’s like three terrible plays that were about 200 yards that make us look entirely different than what we are, and we know that. I’m not worried about it.”

The Seahawks entered Sunday ranked sixth in the league in points allowed at 17.4 per game. They’ve allowed more than 18 points in only one game this season — a 33-27 defeat against the Titans. That was the game Carroll referenced, the game with a few big and costly plays.

What’s clear through six games is that the defense is going to have to keep games close. The offense still hasn’t clicked, and even against the Giants there were issues that might have led to a different result against a better team. The standard is high already, and the loss to the Titans showed this group isn’t immune to problems.

Still, it was noteworthy that after the game the defense’s performance wasn’t really noteworthy. It was just another notch in the belt for a group that has done this so many times before.

It was like that with Mariners pitcher Felix Hernandez for years, too: He had the rare ability to turn what would have been headline-worthy starts for most pitchers into mere subplots. Only the best can do that.

Stuff like that happens with time and consistency, and the Seahawks’ defense has been one of the best in the league for so long that only the breakdowns are truly surprising anymore.

The Giants weren’t a good offensive team before injuries decimated their roster, and they’re close to awful now. Just a week ago, Manning threw for 128 yards. But that was in a victory, and the Giants decided to play it safe, run the ball, let their defense hold the lead.

Manning’s numbers against the Seahawks were especially grisly: He completed less than 50 percent of his passes, averaged 3.44 yards per attempt and didn’t throw for more than 100 yards until the fourth quarter, when the game was out of hand.

The Seahawks were just as good against the run: The Giants averaged 2.7 yards per carry and didn’t have a run longer than 9 yards.

“We just played great all-around team football, and that’s what it is,” cornerback Richard Sherman said. “Nobody is being selfish. Nobody is trying to be greedy. Guys are playing within the scheme and taking the plays that are there. The times you get beat are the times where guys are getting greedy, guys are getting stat hungry and trying to hunt for stats and then you jump out of your gap and give up a big run. You’re letting your teammates down. That’s what you can appreciate about our guys. They try not to do that. Guys are unselfish, and we appreciate that.”

Again, the Giants are a depleted one-victory team. But the Seahawks practically gave up nothing. The only touchdown the Giants scored was the result of a turnover; they started the drive on the Seahawks’ 17.

“Overall, we played a great defensive game,” defensive end Michael Bennett said.

That will likely get lost in the constant search for something new. But Sunday was a reminder that sometimes expected things can still be amazing.