Many thought Kris Richard, the Seahawks’ new defensive coordinator, would bring more pressure this season. Here’s why that hasn’t happened.

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RENTON — The first seven games of the Seahawks’ season have yielded some discussion about what may be different with the defense this season under first-year coordinator Kris Richard.

But one thing hasn’t really changed — how often Seattle brings pressure.

According to numbers compiled by Pro Football Focus, the Seahawks are blitzing about the same amount this year as they did the past two seasons under former defensive coordinator Dan Quinn.

PFF defines blitzing as any time a defense rushes more than the number of players it has on the line of scrimmage. Through seven games, the Seahawks are blitzing 22.6 percent of the time, which again is near the bottom of the NFL, ranked 26th among the 32 teams.

That’s basically in line with the numbers of the past two years under Quinn. Seattle blitzed 23.3 percent of plays in 2014 (24th) and 21.4 percent in 2013 (28th).

Some thought Richard, in his first year as a coordinator at any level after taking over when Quinn became the head coach at Atlanta, might blitz more. That was reinforced when the Seahawks brought lots of pressure in an exhibition game at San Diego.

“I think that’s kind of his personality and something he wants to do,’’ linebacker K.J. Wright said early in the season.

In fact, Richard came out swinging, so to speak, as the Seahawks blitzed on 31.3 percent of plays in the season opener against the Rams, according to PFF’s numbers. Seattle, which was missing strong safety Kam Chancellor the first two games, lost in overtime, allowing a season-high 34 points.

The next week, against Green Bay and quarterback Aaron Rodgers, who is as adept at beating pressure as anyone in the NFL, the Seahawks hardly blitzed at all, bringing pressure on just 4.5 percent of plays.

Those numbers appeared to back up Richard’s statement that he wasn’t necessarily going to blitz more unless the opponent and game circumstances called for it.

“It’s all situational,’’ Richard said this week. “My whole mindset is putting our defense in the best situation possible. If we get situations where it’s going to be best for us to bring some pressure, then I want to make sure that I make the right call and have us do that.”

Since the Green Bay game, Seattle’s blitz numbers have varied from a high of 32.1 percent against Cincinnati to 16.7 on Oct. 22 against the 49ers.

The NFL average is 30.5 percent, according to PFF.

The Seahawks had a season-high six sacks against San Francisco despite its second-lowest blitz rate of the season. Just one sack came via a blitz, according to PFF.

Instead, the Seahawks simply dominated up front, with end Michael Bennett getting 3.5 sacks and end Cliff Avril 1.5.

Being able to get to the quarterback without bringing extra pressure, Richard said, remains the ideal.

“If we can just rush four and drop seven, that suits us more than fine,’’ he said Thursday.

“Ultimately what it comes down to is if we’re not able to do that with four, when are the situations that are going to present the best possibility for us to bring pressure? And that’s what I’m looking for.”

Pressure percentages

Percentage of times the Seahawks have blitzed in each game this season:
Opponent Pct.
At St. Louis 31.3
At Green Bay 4.5
Chicago 27.3
Detroit 29.7
At Cincinnati 32.1
At San Francisco 16.7
Season average 22.6
Source: Pro Football Focus
Pressure percentages

Here is the percentage of times the Seahawks have blitzed in each game this season:

Opponent Pct.
At St. Louis 31.3
At Green Bay 4.5
Chicago 27.3
Detroit 29.7
At Cincinnati 32.1
At San Francisco 16.7
Season average 22.6
Source: Pro Football Focus