Something crazy always happens when the Seahawks play on Thursday nights, and when the Seahawks play Green Bay. Seattle is 7-1 on Thursday Night Football under Pete Carroll. We look back at some of the Seahawks' most memorable Thursday night games.

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That the Seahawks are again venturing into Thursday night football with a game this week against Green Bay that, for Seahawks fans, elicits bad memories of the last time Seattle played a mid-week game.

A little over a year ago, Nov. 9, 2017, to be exact, the Seahawks experienced one of their biggest mixed-emotion games ever on a Thursday night at Arizona.

Seattle got a much-needed win that night but did so at the cost of cornerback Richard Sherman — who left with an Achilles tendon injury that all knew at the time would end his season and might put his Seattle future in peril — and safety Kam Chancellor, who left with two minutes remaining, at the time relatively unnoticed by almost all, but ultimately to (as far as we know, anyway) never return, having suffered a neck injury.

But the Seahawks mostly have good memories of Thursday night overall — they are 5-2 in what is NFL’s official Thursday night package of games that began in 2006, and 7-1 on Thursday night under Pete Carroll when taking into account Thanksgiving games and the regular season opener.

Here, then, the Seahawks’ top five Thursday night moments under Carroll

1. Richard Sherman/Russell Wilson eat turkey in the Bay Area.

Seahawks cornerback Richard Sherman, center, hoists a turkey as his quarterback Russell Wilson, far left, lifts a leg as they leave the field victorious after defeating the San Francisco 49ers 19-3 on Thanksgiving Day, Thursday Nov. 27, 2014 at Levi’s Stadium in Santa Clara, Calif. (John Lok/The Seattle Times)
Seahawks cornerback Richard Sherman, center, hoists a turkey as his quarterback Russell Wilson, far left, lifts a leg as they leave the field victorious after defeating the San Francisco 49ers 19-3 on Thanksgiving Day, Thursday Nov. 27, 2014 at Levi’s Stadium in Santa Clara, Calif. (John Lok/The Seattle Times)

A Turkey Day night game against the 49ers in 2014 — a rematch of the previous year’s memorable NFC Championship game — seemed like a good idea when the schedule was released. But by the time it was played, the 49ers were already in their deep fade in what turned out to be the last year of Jim Harbaugh era and hardly put up a fight against Seattle, which won 19-3, highlighted by two Sherman interceptions of Colin Kaepernick.

The lasting image for most is that of Wilson and Sherman going along with the NBC’s staged post-game plan to have members of the winning team eat turkey at midfield. For all those who worried the stunt might give extra motivation to the 49ers or something, Seattle has won all six games against the 49ers since then.

2. Marshawn Lynch torches Eagles, eats Skittles, gives birth to a Seattle phenomenon.

Seattle Seahawks’ Marshawn Lynch runs against the Philadelphia Eagles in the second half of an NFL football game, Thursday, Dec. 1, 2011, in Seattle. Lynch ran for 148 yards and two touchdowns in the Seahawks 31-14 victory. (AP Photo/Elaine Thompson) SEA143  (Elaine Thompson / The Associated Press)
Seattle Seahawks’ Marshawn Lynch runs against the Philadelphia Eagles in the second half of an NFL football game, Thursday, Dec. 1, 2011, in Seattle. Lynch ran for 148 yards and two touchdowns in the Seahawks 31-14 victory. (AP Photo/Elaine Thompson) SEA143 (Elaine Thompson / The Associated Press)
121211 – SEATTLE, WA – Josh Rowley is dressed in a bag of Skittles hoping to draw the attention of Marshawn Lynch whose favorite candy happens to be Skittles.  When Lynch scored Skittles came flying out of the stands.  (DEAN RUTZ / The Seattle Times)
121211 – SEATTLE, WA – Josh Rowley is dressed in a bag of Skittles hoping to draw the attention of Marshawn Lynch whose favorite candy happens to be Skittles. When Lynch scored Skittles came flying out of the stands. (DEAN RUTZ / The Seattle Times)

No one could have figured a December game between two losing teams — the 3-7 Seahawks and 5-6 Eagles — would give life to one of this city’s more fun sports legacies — Marshawn Lynch’s love of Skittles.

But let the record reflect that it was on Dec. 1, 2011 that it all truly began. Lynch, then in his first full season with the Seahawks, had what was his best game in his Seattle career to that point with 148 yards and two touchdowns in a 31-14 win. After the first TD, a 15-yarder, TV cameras caught Lynch eating Skittles on the sidelines and a phenomenon was born. He was offered a 24-month free supply and a customized dispenser for his locker the next day, and Seattle fans then began showering Lynch with Skittles when he scored in future games.

3. A Seattle sack party and a nickname that never caught on.

Seahawks linebacker Malcolm Smith (53) makes an intercepts a pass intended for Arizona’s Andre Ellington and returns for 32 yards in the second quarter.  (John Lok / The Seattle Times)
Seahawks linebacker Malcolm Smith (53) makes an intercepts a pass intended for Arizona’s Andre Ellington and returns for 32 yards in the second quarter. (John Lok / The Seattle Times)

Seattle’s run to the 2013 Super Bowl included a Thursday night visit to Arizona that contrasted greatly with the one four years later. On Oct. 17, 2013, Seattle had only fun in a 34-22 win over the Cardinals, recording seven sacks of Carson Palmer, one by Malcolm Smith, who also led Seattle that day with nine tackles, which led to some of the linebackers afterward saying they were giving themselves a little nickname — “Hawk Eyes.’’

“You know how the Legion of Boom is?” Bruce Irvin said that night. “We (the linebackers) are the Hawk Eyes. We see everything.’’

Countered Smith: “We might need something better.” Smith suggested “Seahawk Eyes.’’

The nickname didn’t really take root, but Smith was happy enough to add Super Bowl Bowl MVP to his name a few months later.

4. Richard Sherman makes sure Jared Goff gets no free meals.

Richard Sherman lays a viscious hit on LA quarterback Jared Goff knocking him from the game in the 4th.  The Los Angeles Rams played the Seattle Seahawks in Thursday Night Football, December 15 2016 at CenturyLink Field.  (Dean Rutz / The Seattle Times)
Richard Sherman lays a viscious hit on LA quarterback Jared Goff knocking him from the game in the 4th. The Los Angeles Rams played the Seattle Seahawks in Thursday Night Football, December 15 2016 at CenturyLink Field. (Dean Rutz / The Seattle Times)

Sherman had a knack for being in the middle of things on Thursday nights during his seven-year Seattle career. A 24-3 game against the Rams late in the 2016 season would have been memorable only for Jon Ryan’s ill-fated fake punt (he ran for 33 yards before losing  the ball and getting blasted) and garish uniforms if not for Sherman, who first unleashed another of several sideline outbursts that season.

This time, he questioned a play call from the 1-yard-line in the third quarter, then blasted Jared Goff  — at the time in his rookie season — into the air and about five feet out of bounds when Goff tried to scramble into the end zone in the fourth quarter. Goff had to leave the game to be examined for a concussion though Sherman didn’t seem to have much sympathy. “We don’t give free meals,” Sherman said. “So he had to feel it.”

5. Raising (a flag) and Romping (Green Bay)

Seahawks wide receiver Percy Harvin runs past Packers player Micah Hyde in the first quarter against the Green Bay Packers at CenturyLink Field in Seattle on September 4, 2014.
 (John Lok / The Seattle Times)
Seahawks wide receiver Percy Harvin runs past Packers player Micah Hyde in the first quarter against the Green Bay Packers at CenturyLink Field in Seattle on September 4, 2014. (John Lok / The Seattle Times)

Okay, so technically the NFL Kickoff Thursday night game is sort of its own deal and not part of the regular Thursday Night package.

But Thursday night is Thursday night. And Seattle’s opener on a Thursday night in 2014 was as glorious as could be.

There was no Super Bowl hangover apparent on this night as the Seahawks raised their banner and then tore apart the same Green Bay team they would have to beat a few months later to get back to the Super Bowl again, 36-16. What may be forgotten is who did a lot of the damage – Percy Harvin — who for one night turned in the kind of performance that compelled Seattle to trade for him the year before with 41 yards on four carries, 59 yards on seven receptions and a 31-yard kickoff return.

This game also marked the beginning and end of the Earl Thomas-punt return experiment. Thomas had two attempts for three yards and never did it again.