Due to a penalty levied by the NFL for violating rules last year on how much contact is allowed during minicamps, the Seahawks will be able to practice on-field just once this year instead of the maximum three.

Share story

The Seahawks will give new meaning to the term minicamp this year.

Due to a penalty levied by the NFL for violating rules last year on how much contact is allowed during minicamps, the Seahawks will be able to practice on-field just once this year instead of the maximum three.

Players have been in meetings this week, but a practice that can last 2½ hours Thursday is the only on-field work the team will get.

“I think any time you don’t get to practice you probably lose something,’’ offensive-line coach Tom Cable said last week. “But at the same time, you all see how we work, and we get a lot more done than most.’’

After Thursday, the Seahawks will be off until training camp begins in late July.

So what will we see in the Seahawks’ one-day minicamp? Here are five things to watch:

1. Who’s on the field? Minicamp is mandatory, with players subject to fines of up to $70,000 if they don’t attend. So every Seahawks player showed up this week, including defensive end Michael Bennett and linebacker Bruce Irvin, who sat out OTAs (organized team activities) in protest of their contract situations. But how much we’ll see everybody on the field is another matter. Because the Seahawks have just one workout, they might be even more cautious with players.

2. T-Jack is back: For the first time this offseason, the Seahawks will have three quarterbacks on the field with Tarvaris Jackson officially back in the fold, joining Russell Wilson and R.J. Archer. Jackson’s signing became official Tuesday.

3. The rookie class: Most of the rookies received a good taste of what a Seahawks practice is like through 10 OTAs the previous three weeks. But a minicamp practice, with everybody there, sometimes can have a different vibe. And for two rookies — former University of Washington receiver Kasen Williams and safety Ryan Murphy of Oregon State, a seventh-round draft pick — this will be their first practice. Neither was able to take part in OTAs because their college classes had yet to graduate. The Seahawks’ other seven draft picks took part in OTAs. Williams signed his contract this week after having impressed the Seahawks during rookie minicamp. But going up against veterans obviously will represent a new challenge.

4. Christine Michael: Tailback Marshawn Lynch is attending the minicamp after sitting out OTAs — as is his custom — but it’s unlikely he’ll see any field time (last year he attended but sat out all three days). That would mean another heavy dose of Christine Michael, for whom this season looms large. Michael is entering his third year but has yet to carve out a definitive role. With Lynch absent for OTAs and backup Robert Turbin continuing to rehab from hip surgery, Michael was the primary tailback during OTAs and should get another chance Thursday to be the lead in the backfield.

5. Who’s at center? The most competitive position battle entering the offseason is at center, as the Seahawks searched for a replacement for the traded Max Unger. Lemuel Jeanpierre worked primarily with the starting offense in OTAs, but Drew Nowak — a practice-squad member last year — worked with the starting unit in the last OTA that was open to the media. Patrick Lewis also figures into a battle that likely won’t be decided until a few weeks or so into training camp, with rookie Kristjan Sokoli more of a long shot to win the job this year.