Lockette said he’s too focused on the task at hand — getting ready for another season and winning a spot on Seattle’s 53-man roster at a receiver position that looks as competitive as ever — to obsess much over the Super Bowl play gone awry.

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RENTON — Ricardo Lockette might try to turn away every time the Seahawks’ last offensive play of the Super Bowl pops up on TV. He might try to turn a deaf ear every time some passer-by brings it up.

But he has no choice but to relive it daily on the practice field during training camp.

The play in question, in case any Seahawks fans need reminding, turned into a Super Bowl-deciding interception when a Russell Wilson pass from the 1-yard-line intended for Lockette was intercepted by New England’s Malcolm Butler.

On the play, Lockette lined up to the right side of the line, and to the right of and just behind fellow receiver Jermaine Kearse. He then cut behind and inside Kearse as Wilson threw.

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But Butler got to the ball first, with Lockette falling to the ground as the Seahawks, in the blink of an eye, went from potential repeat Super Bowl champions to being victims of one of the most stunning defeats in the history of sports.

It was a common two-man receiver concept the Seahawks use regularly. And as a new season begins, it’s a concept the Seahawks are practicing more than ever.

Not so much because of what happened in the Super Bowl, according to Dave Canales, who was recently promoted to receivers coach, but because it’s something the Seahawks simply want to do better in 2015.

“That’s been one of our offseason (points of) emphasis, is to just really work on those two-man combination routes,’’ Canales said. “So it (the end of the Super Bowl) comes up all the time.’’

Though that might seem like torture to some, Canales said he thinks it has been “therapeutic.’’

“When you do talk about it, even if you don’t say specifically, ‘Now, you remember in the Super Bowl’ we are all thinking it when we talk about those things,’’ Canales said. “So we just have to kind of take a little slice of humble pie and keep moving.’’

But Canales — who replaced the retiring Kippy Brown as receivers coach — said the play was more about what the Patriots did right than what the Seahawks did wrong.

“They really played it brilliantly,’’ he said, adding that, “We talk about plays like that all the time, and so it comes up and we say, ‘Well, here’s the different angles that happened, here’s the techniques that we want to get done.’ ’’

Lockette said he’s too focused on the task at hand — getting ready for another season and winning a spot on Seattle’s 53-man roster at a receiver position that looks as competitive as ever — to obsess much over the Super Bowl play gone awry.

Asked Monday if he has any regrets about the play, he said, “Nope. Don’t even think about it.’’

Does it keep him up at night? “No shape, form or fashion,’’ he said.

Not even when thinking how close he came to capping what would have been one of the more dramatic comebacks in Super Bowl history, and all that would have gone along with that?

“No, because it wouldn’t have been me (being the hero); it was the team,’’ he said. “Everybody who made a play, everybody who made a catch or made a pass or had a great block in that game was a hero.’’

Still, it took a while for Lockette to discuss the play publicly.

He didn’t speak to the media after the game and hadn’t commented on the play until writing a first-person story for the website “The Players’ Tribune” a few weeks ago.

The article began with Lockette stating: “I can’t watch the film. I absolutely can’t stand to see it.’’

That doesn’t mean he hasn’t.

“I mean, yeah, it’s everywhere, you know?’’ Lockette said. “So I’ve seen it. But I don’t really like watch it to study it as film. I might glance at it and continue my conversation if it’s on TV.’’

What he also tries to avoid is getting caught up in what others have said about the play and his role in it.

“I don’t really pay attention,’’ he said. “I hear them. I respect everybody’s opinion. But it’s just like some random guy telling you that you are the greatest in the world. That doesn’t mean you are the greatest in the world. It’s really about how you feel about yourself and how your teammates feel about you and the people who matter to you most.’’

Besides, Lockette said he’s learned anew that talk is cheap.

In “The Players’ Tribune” story he wrote of the end of the play that “I will never forget that pain. Never.’’

Asked if writing the article or talking about it helped make it any easier, Lockette shook his head.

“No,’’ he said. “The only thing that will make it better is getting back to that point and completing the pass and winning the Super Bowl.’’