Seattle didn't bring Marshall to town with the intention of striking a quick deal. The visit was characterized as more of an introduction between the Seahawks and Marshall, a chance for Seattle to get to know the Pro Bowl receiver with a history of arrests and suspensions before it decides whether to sign him.

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On an atypically cloudless March day, the Seahawks brought a star out to Seattle.

Receiver Brandon Marshall landed in scenic fashion, arriving at the Seahawks’ lakefront headquarters in a seaplane.

It’s a familiar approach, one the Seahawks used to woo T.J. Houshmandzadeh, the NFL’s top free-agent wide receiver a year ago.

That’s where the parallels end, though.

Where Houshmandzadeh’s waterfront arrival signaled the start of a full-court press to sign him, Marshall’s visit with the Seahawks was the first step in a what likely will be a much longer negotiation process.

Seattle didn’t bring Marshall to town with the intention of striking a quick deal. The visit was characterized as more of an introduction between the Seahawks and Marshall, a chance for Seattle to get to know the Pro Bowl receiver with a history of arrests and suspensions before it decides whether to sign him.

But as a restricted free agent from Denver, Marshall’s addition would involve more than just an agreement between player and team. If Seattle wants to sign him it must either give up the No. 6 overall pick, which is considered unlikely, or get Denver to agree to a lesser amount of compensation.

The question is how fast the process will play out. A year ago, Seattle was just one of several teams pursuing Houshmandzadeh. The Vikings aggressively pursued him and the Bengals hoped he would come back. That competition compelled teams to act quickly.

Marshall’s agent has not returned calls, but there are no signs of another team being hot after Marshall or vice versa. The Baltimore Ravens were considered a team that needed a top-flight receiver, but they traded for Arizona’s Anquan Boldin on Friday.

So what happens next with Marshall and Seattle? Well, that might take some time to figure out, most likely more than the four days Seattle needed to secure an agreement from Houshmandzadeh last season.

Marshall’s arrival Saturday was more like a first step in a process that will have to include multiple negotiations involving three different parties.

Notes

• Cornerback William James of Detroit is scheduled to visit Seattle on Thursday.

• Tight end Chris Baker of New England and running back Mike Bell of New Orleans are also scheduled for free-agent visits with the Seahawks, according to ESPN.

Danny O’Neil: 206-464-2364 or doneil@seattletimes.com