Now, as the driver of the boat he idolized as a child, Eacret’s new goal is to affect the next generation of pilots in a similar way.

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Kevin Eacret still has a photograph from his childhood of him signing the bottom of a KISW boat.

“That was my favorite boat back then,” said Eacret, who lives in Snohomish. “I used to drive my friends crazy saying, ‘One of these days, I’m going to drive one of those.’ ”

His childhood dream is now a reality. KISW/Miss Rock, which was a prominent sponsor during the 1980s and ’90s but hasn’t supported a boat since 2005, made its return to H1 Unlimited competition this season, doubling with CarStar to sponsor Eacret’s U-99.9 boat.

The deal came about because CarStar had an existing partnership with KISW, which agreed to co-sponsor the boat, bringing back KISW’s vintage black, red and yellow color scheme.

“This is my dream come true, bringing KISW aboard,” Eacret said.

Now, as the driver of the boat he idolized as a child, Eacret’s new goal is to affect the next generation of pilots in a similar way.

“When I was little, I’d see the drivers and not many people wanted to take the time for kids,” he said. “That’s one of my main things. I want to make sure I’m seen out in front with the kids. That’s what makes it special for me.”

Notes

• The pre-race penalties on Jimmy Shane and Jean Theoret, each accrued for failing twice to meet the 80-mile-per-hour minimum, were only the second and third all season on the 2016 H1 Unlimited circuit.

U-5 driver J. Michael Kelly was called for one such penalty in the third heat race of the MainSource Bank Madison Regatta in July, but that has been the only other penalty of this type to be accrued in 2016.

The rule was implemented last year to prevent pilots from stalling once they had established a lane position before the race. Boats are required to have a light that will light up when the boat’s speed falls below 80 miles per hour, alerting officials to the violation.

• Water conditions in last weekend’s Tri-Cities’ HAPO Columbia Cup race could not have been more different from Saturday’s opening heat in the Albert Lee Appliance Cup.

The Tri-Cities course, which features longer straightaways and turns than its Seattle counterpart, was smooth and fast on race day, rookie driver Andrew Tate said.

“It’s a big, wide-open course,” Tate said. “Here you have the log boom and tighter corners and shorter straightaways than Tri-Cities.”

Additionally, the choppy nature of Lake Washington increased the contrast between races.

“The water gets turned up pretty quickly and it’s unpredictable as far as which ways the waves go,” Tate said.