After two days and 163 games, including 118 on Wednesday alone, John Isner and Nicolas Mahut left Court 18 at Wimbledon with records for the longest match, in both time elapsed and number of games, in professional tennis history. Even though it had not ended.

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WIMBLEDON, England — The tennis match that would not end did not.

After two days and 163 games, including 118 on Wednesday alone, John Isner and Nicolas Mahut left Court 18 at Wimbledon with records for the longest match, in both time elapsed and number of games, in professional tennis history. Even though it had not ended.

The chair umpire suspended the match (again) because of darkness (again), seven hours, six minutes in. Not seven hours into the match. Seven hours into the fifth set. At that point, Isner and Mahut had produced an epic standstill, two sets apiece, 59-59 suspended in time. They will resume Thursday.

“Nothing like this will ever happen again,” Isner said. “Ever.”

Aside from a brief on-court television interview, the players were not available to answer questions.

As the match wore on, Isner, 25, appeared ready to collapse. He looked tired. Beyond tired. Can-you-believe-my-match-lasted-10-hours tired. He looked as if he wanted to cry, or crawl off the court, or find the nearest bed and sleep for a year or five.

Instead, at 58-58, he tossed his racket on the grass and lumbered toward the bathroom. That might seem insignificant. So might a first-round match at Wimbledon between unheralded players.

Isner returned and scratched out his fifth match point, only to watch Mahut boom another ace. Shortly afterward, Mahut, a 28-year-old Frenchman, approached the chair umpire and said that he could no longer serve or see. Isner joined the conversation and threw his head back, clearly miffed at the direction — Thursday, round three — the match was headed.

“We couldn’t agree to play,” he said. “So they canceled.”

Novak Djokovic, the third seed, said players gathered around the televisions in the locker rooms for hours. Across the ocean, Kobe Bryant told reporters that he and his Los Angeles Lakers teammates watched it, too.

Roger Federer walked onto Court 1 for his second-round match while Isner and Mahut were at 11-11 in the fifth. Federer won, showered, dressed and pushed back his news conference at least three times.

“This is a very special match,” he said. “I hope somehow this is going to end.”

While Federer addressed the media, the 23rd-seeded Isner and unseeded Mahut kept on their serve-dominated match. Both broke the men’s singles record for aces in one match (98 for Isner, 95 for Mahut).

At 10 hours, the match easily surpassed the previously longest match in tennis history: 6 hours, 33 minutes, set at the 2004 French Open.

The Associated Press contributed to this report.