Quentin, 32, has played in the big leagues for nine seasons and was twice named to the all-star team with the Chicago White Sox. He hit 20 or more home runs in five different seasons.

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In a low-risk move to add some depth with the possibility of big-league help, the Mariners signed outfielder Carlos Quentin to a minor-league contract Wednesday afternoon.

Quentin will report to Class AAA Tacoma.

Quentin became a free agent after he was released April 14 shortly after being traded from the Padres to the Braves as part of six-player deal that sent all-star closer Craig Kimbrel to San Diego.

Quentin, 32, has played in the big leagues for nine seasons and has a career line of .252/.347/.484. He was twice named to the all-star team with the Chicago White Sox and hit 20 or more home runs in five different seasons.

When healthy, he can be a productive player with some power. But that’s the key — he hasn’t been healthy for much of the last three seasons, never appearing in more than 100 games.

He had two surgeries on his right knee in 2012 and played in 86 games. In 2013, he had a third surgery on the knee after the pain persisted and played in just 82 games. Last season, he suffered a bone bruise on his left knee during spring training and missed the first 39 games of the season. He then missed the final 58 games of the season with soreness in the knee.

Because of the knee issues, Quentin’s days in the outfield are likely to be limited. He worked on converting to first base this spring with the Padres. Expect that to continue going forward in Tacoma.

If Logan Morrison’s bat continues to slump, perhaps Quentin is called up as a platoon candidate at first base and a sometime designated hitter.

Any call-up could happen sooner rather than later. Quentin has a May 12 opt-out deadline for his contract with the Mariners.

Notes

• The Mariners played their 15th game of the season and used their 14th different lineup. The biggest change came with Seth Smith at leadoff. Smith came into Wednesday’s game with a .355 on-base percentage and a career .347 on-base percentage. He hit leadoff 60 times in his career, including 10 times last season.

“Nothing changes for me,” he said. “I did it for a stretch last year, and I did it with the Rockies for a little bit. You are the first hitter, and really it’s no different after that. And even that first one is no different. You just have to physically be prepared to hit earlier than if you are batting down in the lineup.”

James Paxton’s ERA went up on Wednesday without even throwing a pitch. Major League Baseball informed Seattle of a pair of scoring changes that hurt Paxton’s ERA and helped Austin Jackson’s batting average.

In Paxton’s run-filled third inning on April 19 against the Rangers, MLB decided to award Elvis Andrus with a single on a ground ball that was ruled an error on shortstop Willie Bloomquist. Because of that, it added five earned runs to his pitching line. Paxton’s ERA ballooned from 5.40 to 8.40.

Jackson was credited with a base hit on a ground ball that was mishandled by Adrian Gonzalez in a game against the Dodgers on April 15. His batting average moved up to .268.