Emerging from the fray at 5 under overall were Jordan Spieth, the 21-year-old who won the Masters in April, and budding star Patrick Reed, 24, who is looking for a breakthrough in the majors.

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UNIVERSITY PLACE — Buckle up.

It looks like it’s going to be a wild ride this weekend in the U.S. Open at Chambers Bay.

 

It certainly was Friday, when the leaderboard changed at a dizzying pace, with eight players having at least a piece of the lead at some point in the second round. Trying to predict the leader was an act of futility.

Finally, after all the swings in momentum, the leading score did not change. Only the leaders did.

Photos from the U.S. Open

Emerging from the fray at 5 under overall were Jordan Spieth, the 21-year-old who won the Masters in April, and budding star Patrick Reed, 24, who is looking for a breakthrough in the majors.

It certainly is not a comfortable lead, not with 27 players within six shots and 34 within seven.

Though the tournament seems wide open entering the weekend, there are a slew of big stars who will not be playing after missing the cut, including Tiger Woods, Rickie Fowler, Bubba Watson and defending champion Martin Kaymer.

Spieth, ranked second in the world, had no such worries. He capitalized on an advantageous early tee time and made an eight-foot birdie putt on the ninth hole, his final one of the day, to shoot a 3-under 67. Reed, playing late in the afternoon when conditions were the toughest, was poised to lead by himself entering the weekend but had a three-putt bogey on the 18th hole to fall into a tie with Spieth.

Still, it was a 69 for Reed, who has won four times on the PGA Tour in the past couple of years but whose best finish in five previous majors appearances is a tie for 22nd at this year’s Masters. But despite having one of the best scores in the afternoon, Reed was not happy with how he played.

“I actually felt like it was a pretty disappointing round,” he said. “But we’re in a good position. It’s definitely going to be a tournament that anyone has a chance to win.”

Spieth ended his day in style, but not until after a scary scene near the ninth green. Jason Day, one of Spieth’s playing partners, collapsed to the ground while walking to the ninth green. Play was halted while Day was attended to by medical personnel. Day, suffering from vertigo, eventually finished the hole and made a bogey.

Spieth somehow kept his focus after the emotional delay.

“That was one of the best birdies I’ve ever made given all the situation,” he said. “Obviously, there was some wait time in between, but I actually got somewhat of a read off Jason’s putt and was able to knock it in.”

For most of the afternoon, it appeared that Dustin Johnson, who shared the first-round lead with Henrik Stenson, would be the second-round leader as well. He led by two shots after reaching 7 under after a birdie on the 11th hole. But three bogeys in the final five holes left him a shot behind Spieth and Reed and in a tie for third with Branden Grace from South Africa.

“I just didn’t hole the putts like yesterday,” said Johnson, who shot a 71 after opening with a 65. “That was pretty much the only difference.”

Both of them, along with many, many others, still have a reason to like their chances.

“I like where I’m at,” Johnson said. “Still got 36 holes of golf (and) a lot can happen. I like where I’m at.”