Horschel was the most vocal and direct golfer to criticize Chambers Bay, but he wasn’t alone. The issue of the quality of the greens has simmered all week, but it revved up Sunday.

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UNIVERSITY PLACE — Billy Horschel drove down the steep slope leading to Chambers Bay on Sunday morning and pulled out his phone to snap a few pictures.

“It’s a spectacular view,” said Horschel, who called Chambers Bay the best setting of any course he’d been to. “I would tell anyone to come here, because the view is unbelievable.”

And yet a few hours later, the lasting images of Horschel were anything but serene. On the sixth green, Horschel nearly slammed his club into the green after missing a putt. On No. 9, he wove his hands like a fish swimming, mimicking the wavy trajectory of his ball after another missed putt.

Horschel smiled at the interview area after shooting 3-under 67 on Sunday and said, “I’ve been waiting for this aaaaalll week.”

And then he scorched Earth.

“I think a lot of players, and I’m one of them, have lost some respect for the USGA and this championship this year for the greens,” Horschel said. “And not only the greens, but one of the biggest issues I have is for the fans. “I feel like the fans got robbed this week being able to get up close to the players and see the shots we hit and see the course to the degree that we see it.”

Horschel was the most vocal and direct golfer to criticize Chambers Bay, but he wasn’t alone. The issue of the quality of the greens has simmered all week, but it revved up Sunday.

Chris Kirk, who shot a 10 on No. 1, tweeted after his round Sunday, “The U.S. Open is a great tournament with incredible history. The ‪@usga should be ashamed of what they did to it this week.”

I think a lot of players, and I’m one of them, have lost some respect for the USGA and this championship this year for the greens.” - Billy Horschel

Camilo Villegas tweeted, “Happy to be done. Not my best game this week but what a shame to play a ‪@usopengolf on the worst greens I have ever played at… Shame.”

Morgan Hoffman said it was “unfortunate” how the greens played and said they didn’t “roll very well, especially for a U.S. Open.”

Henrik Stenson said this week that putting on the greens at Chambers Bay was like “putting on broccoli.” Rory McIlroy corrected Stenson later by saying, “I think they’re more like cauliflower.”

Even Jordan Spieth, who was tied for the lead entering Sunday, said on Saturday, “The greens aren’t what we normally see.”

Geoff Ogilvy said the criticism of the greens has been “pretty fair” and called some of the greens “questionable surfaces.” He also said the course had issues logistically.

But Ogilvy admitted that part of the problem rested with the golfers.

“I think we’re a little bet precious sometimes as pros,” Ogilvy said. “I think it’s actually — it’s not what we wanted, but it’s still fine.”

Ogilvy added, “We’re so spoiled, we get such perfect surfaces and such perfect conditions everywhere we play. We’re just not used to seeing it.”

Matt Thurmond, the UW golf coach and Cheng-Tsung Pan’s caddie, pushed back against the criticism. He said it was “embarrassing” that pros have complained so much.

USGA executive director Mike Davis has also pushed back, saying this week on Fox that the greens “are better than they look.” He said that a lot of the problem is “your eyes telling you it doesn’t look like it’s going to be smooth.’’

Larry Gilhuly, who helped prepare the course for the U.S. Open and is the agronomist for the West Region of the USGA, called the greens “smooth as a billiard table.”

And perhaps more to the point: The leaderboard had many of the top golfers in the game fighting for position at the top.

Horschel had the sharpest criticism of Chambers Bay, even though he called the course fair and generous from tee to green.

Horschel said a few of the greens that were reseeded months before the tournament, such as holes 7 and 13, have played perfectly. But he said many of the other holes were problematic and inconsistent.

Of No. 10, he said, “That hole is in dirt. It’s literally dirt.”

Of No. 4, he said, “I heard a comment that I thought was absolutely hilarious. A TV anchor for Fox asked the caddie, ‘How much grass — is there any grass on No. 4 green?’ He said, ‘Yeah, two blades, and they’re nowhere close to each other.’”

Horschel was also critical of course designer Robert Trent Jones Jr. and Davis.

“For the architect, obviously I know who it was, Trent Jones, to say that they built this golf course for the U.S. Open is awful,” Horschel said. “And I heard today that Mike Davis had input in this golf course, which blows my mind even more that they would build a golf course and not think about the fans and the viewing aspect of it. Because that’s the greatest thing that we have.”

Horschel said he wouldn’t mind coming back to Chambers Bay for a U.S. Open under different conditions.

“You know what, if the greens were smooth and they had a better surface,” he said, “I don’t mind coming back.”