Eighty-four years after the Washington men’s eight traveled to Berlin and defeated the heavily favored Germans to capture Olympic gold, the ‘Boys in the Boat’ claimed another victory on Friday — one that in our humble opinion is their greatest achievement yet.

After nearly 69,000 total votes, those Boys in the Boat claimed victory over yet another juggernaut — Edgar Martinez’s series-clinching double in the 1995 ALDS against the Yankees — to earn the (unofficial) crown of Seattle’s greatest sports moment. And it wasn’t particularly close.

[ Revisit the bracket » ]

The Washington crew fans came out in force to propel their beloved Olympians past some stiff competition as a No. 6 seeds in the Times’ bracket. UW conquered Megan Rapinoe’s triumphant pose after scoring two goals in the 2019 Women’s World Cup against France, then unseated King Felix and his perfect game in 2012, before taming the beast and defeating Marshawn Lynch’s BeastQuake run in 2011. Then, in another upset, the boys took down the ’95 Mariners by more than 600 votes to claim our virtual gold medal and bragging rights as Seattle’s top sports moment.

THEN: Posing in front of the Shell House doors are “The Boys in the Boat” (from left): Don Hume, Joe Rantz, George “Shorty” Hunt, Jim “Stub” McMillin, John White, Gordy Adam, Chuck Day and Roger Morris, with (front) coxswain Bobby Moch. (Courtesy University of Washington Libraries Special Collections)
THEN: Posing in front of the Shell House doors are “The Boys in the Boat” (from left): Don Hume, Joe Rantz, George “Shorty” Hunt, Jim “Stub” McMillin, John White, Gordy Adam, Chuck Day and Roger Morris, with (front) coxswain Bobby Moch. (Courtesy University of Washington Libraries Special Collections)

That 1936 gold medal launched UW’s proud tradition and dominance on the water, and the team has been widely publicized through Redmond author Daniel James Brown’s 2013 NYT bestseller “Boys in the Boat”.

As Brown told The Times in 2014, the story is about much more than sports. “These nine Americans, who climbed in the boat and learned to pull together, (are) almost the perfect metaphor for what that generation did. They endured the Depression and (World War I). Pull together, build great teams, get things done.”