50 Pine Street, a four-story building of 68 luxury homes, is located in the Edmonds Bowl overlooking Marine Beach Park.

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EDMONDS — Only a handful of opportunities are still available at the popular condominium community of 50 Pine Street, where sales are in the final close-out stage.

Located in the Edmonds Bowl overlooking Marine Beach Park, 50 Pine Street is a four-story building of 68 luxury homes that offer views of Puget Sound, the Olympic Mountains and Mount Baker, along with ready proximity to some of the area’s largest employment centers.

And when residents come home to 50 Pine Street, they come home to one of the most picturesque waterfront towns in Washington, says Nancy Marsh, sales manager at 50 Pine Street.

“The small-town vibe of Edmonds, located on the shores of Puget Sound approximately 15 miles north of downtown Seattle, is just one of many reasons 50 Pine Street is such a sought-after address,” says Marsh, a longtime resident of the town. And, she says, with housing prices in Seattle and Bellevue prohibitive to many first-time buyers, “Edmonds offers a great quality of life that’s attainable.”

Homes at 50 Pine Street are priced from $434,950 to $759,950. A $5,000 buyer’s bonus on the final homes makes 50 Pine Street even more appealing, Marsh says.

Trudi Knight moved into her new home at 50 Pine Street in January, relocating from Capitol Hill in Seattle, and she’s delighted with her decision.

Kitchens feature slab quartz countertops, undermount sinks and hardwood flooring.
Kitchens feature slab quartz countertops, undermount sinks and hardwood flooring.

“I was one of the first people to move into the building,” she says. “Since then, the building has filled up and the neighbors are wonderful. Everyone is so gracious.”

All homes at 50 Pine Street are built to endure, using long-lasting, low-maintenance designs and materials. Finished with designer-specified materials, colors, fixtures and cabinetry, each home is planned to take maximum advantage of the natural light and available views.

“My view is 180 degrees and there is even an eagle’s nest near my deck,” says Knight.

Every unit offers an inviting master bedroom with walk-in closet, chef’s kitchen with slab quartz countertop and undermount sink, hardwood flooring in the kitchen and living areas, wall-to-wall carpet in the bedrooms, and a laundry room with front-loading Whirlpool washer and dryer. The kitchens feature European-style cabinetry and stainless-steel KitchenAid appliance packages with gas ranges.

Parking is available for each unit, with extra storage available for select units.

Building amenities include a rooftop deck with barbecue and spacious firepit patio, perfect for summer parties or just unwinding while watching the Edmonds-Kingston Ferry coming and going on Puget Sound.

“The firepit patio is beautiful at sunset,” Knight said.

Unlike some condo communities, 50 Pine Street does not have a rental cap, which means owners can live in their new homes for a few years, then turn them into rentals if they choose. Owners have very little maintenance they need to perform, which Marsh says should keep the whole building looking pristine for years to come.

Edmonds is situated in Snohomish County midway between Seattle and Everett, making it ideal for city commuters who need quick access to work, but want to come home to a quaint beach community. Seattle commuters can catch the Sounder train for a 30-minute, nonstop waterfront ride.

People who live in Edmonds are moments away from nearly 50 cafés and dining destinations, 11 health and medical centers, and an abundance of shops and boutiques.

“Edmonds has everything you could ever want,” Knight said. “It’s a beautiful, welcoming city.”

For outdoor pursuits, Edmonds features two miles of shoreline and dozens of dog-friendly parks and recreation areas, including Edmonds City Park at 600 Third Ave., where a splash feature for children — the Hazel Miller Spray Pad — opened in May.

The Edmonds Underwater Park at Brackett’s Landing, designed just for divers, is a series of man-made reef structures interspersed with sunken vessels in various states of decay, creating an extensive artificial habitat for a wide variety of marine life. The Edmonds Underwater Park is the most popular of Washington’s 10 underwater parks, attracting about 25,000 scuba divers each year.