A woman who was found dead Monday in her Redmond apartment had moved to the Pacific Northwest about six months ago and was working for a software-development and data-storage company in Bellevue, her former supervisor said.

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A woman who was found slain Monday in her Redmond apartment had moved to the Pacific Northwest about six months ago and was working for a software-development and data-storage company in Bellevue, her supervisor said.

The woman’s identity has not been released by Redmond police or the King County Medical Examiner’s Office, but she was identified as Arpana Jinaga, 24, by her supervisor at the EMC Corp., where she had worked since about April.

Her death is being investigated as a homicide.

Redmond police went to Jinaga’s apartment Monday morning after they were contacted by a friend of the woman’s, said Jim Bove, Redmond police spokesman.

Bove said a preliminary investigation showed the door was forced open, shattering the door jam. There was an indication the victim struggled with the assailant. The cause of death is unknown.

“We are in the early stages of this investigation and it will likely be several days before we have more extensive information,” Bove said.

“She was a very outgoing person,” said Muhammad Ali, software quality-assurance manager for EMC in Bellevue. Jinaga was from India and was highly skilled in her job, Ali said.

News reports indicate that in 2004 she had been a prizewinner in a competition sponsored by Microchip Technology Inc., of Chandler, Ariz., in which she designed a communications jammer using a digital signal controller.

Her father, B.C. Jinaga, was identified as the head of the School of Information Technology at the Jawaharlal Nehru Technological University by The Times of India. She had last visited her family in 2006, The Times reported.

Jinaga received a master’s degree in electrical and computer engineering from Rutgers University in New Jersey in October 2007, according to the university.

She was offered a job with EMC as a software quality-assurance engineer last spring, Ali said.

“She thought this might be a challenging experience,” Ali said.

Jinaga immediately established herself as a valuable employee and became involved in a variety of interests, he said. She volunteered with a fire department and at an animal shelter and was active in a motorcycle club.

“[When] she came here, instead of getting a car, she rode a motorcycle,” Ali said. “She loved to give very generously and loved to help people.”

Ali said he became concerned about Jinaga when she hadn’t come to work by about 11 a.m. Monday. He tried to reach her by cellphone but got no response.

At the same time, Jinaga’s family in India became concerned that they also couldn’t contact her and called a friend to check on her.

The friend went to her apartment at the Valley View Apartments in the 8900 block of the Redmond-Woodinville Road Northeast Monday morning and then called 911.

Peyton Whitely: 206-464-2259 or pwhitely@seattletimes.com