Meet Laura Gordon, Emily Eng and Mohammed Kloub, critical behind-the-scenes journalists who make sure the information we deliver to you 24/7 is timely, accurate and relevant.

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You probably don’t know their names or what they do, but they’re three of the unsung heroes of The Seattle Times’ newsroom.

Meet Laura Gordon, Emily M. Eng and Mohammed Kloub.

They are three of our critical behind-the-scenes journalists who make sure the information we deliver to you 24/7 is timely, accurate and relevant.

The Seattle Times simply wouldn’t be the same without this talented trio and many more dedicated staff members like them.

Newspapers never have been very good at explaining what we do and why we do it. We don’t often pull back the curtain, although readers seem fascinated when they get a glimpse inside our deadline-driven world.

We’re getting a little better at it. We publish “Behind The Byline,” an occasional Q&A with a Times journalist. The Seattle Times’ marketing department created “Moving Forward, Making an Impact,” a series of short video stories featuring employees across the company, including several journalists. But we need that kind of transparency and insight more often.

Education Lab is a Seattle Times project that spotlights promising approaches to persistent challenges in public education. It is produced in partnership with the Solutions Journalism Network and is funded by a grant from the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation and City University of Seattle. Learn more about Ed Lab 

So let me introduce you to Gordon, Eng and Kloub. I’ll let them explain who they are, what they do and why they do it.

Laura Gordon is the news enterprise coordinator for The Seattle Times. (Alan Berner / The Seattle Times)
Laura Gordon is the news enterprise coordinator for The Seattle Times. (Alan Berner / The Seattle Times)

Laura Gordon has worked at The Times for 21 years in key editing roles. The Poulsbo native discovered journalism her senior year at Western Washington University and honed her skills at five newspapers before arriving here.

She’s our enterprise coordinator, the project manager and lead copy editor for many of our biggest projects. Lynda Mapes’ and Steve Ringman’s incredible “Hostile Waters: Orcas in Peril” series has Gordon’s fingerprints all over it. She compares pulling together the stories, photos, videos, graphics and other components for that and many other projects to the juggling act of cooking Thanksgiving dinner.

Believe me, Gordon is a master chef.

She rarely has a byline and hates taking credit, but her eyes light up when asked about what she does and The Seattle Times people she has worked with, past, present and future.

“It starts with the staff,” she said. “I’ve learned so much from people who are gone now, and I hope to pass along their wisdom to people just starting their careers. But I’m also learning a lot from new people. They bring refreshing change, outlook and skills to our newsroom.”

Emily M. Eng is a news  artist for The Seattle Times. (Bettina Hansen / The Seattle Times)
Emily M. Eng is a news artist for The Seattle Times. (Bettina Hansen / The Seattle Times)

One of those talented newer journalists is Emily M. Eng, a Bellevue native who we hired as a graphic artist two years ago and who worked closely with Gordon and Mapes on “Hostile Waters.” Quiet and creative, Eng sculpted a clay orca, baking it in a toaster oven and hand painting it to help illustrate the story.

The project came naturally for Eng, who graduated from Santa Clara University, intent on becoming a marine biologist. After teaching stints, she earned a graduate certification in science illustration, then honed her skills at National Geographic.

“I see myself in more of a teacher role,” she said. “I want to help illuminate.”

That she does. She creates many of the charts, maps, graphics and informational diagrams that help tell our stories.

What does she love about The Seattle Times? “Everyone is striving for the best quality, and they love what they do,” she said. “Everyone is trying to push each other. We are not afraid to take a risk.”

Moh Kloub, who immigrated to Vancouver, Wash., from Jordan when he was 6 and graduated from the University of Washington, will celebrate his first anniversary at The Times in January. Yet he is already in his second role here – Engagement Editor for Education Lab, the innovative community-funded journalism team. He’s part of the wave of “digital natives” flowing into our newsroom.

Moh Kloub is the engagement editor for The Seattle Times’ Education Lab.
(Bettina Hansen / The Seattle Times)
Moh Kloub is the engagement editor for The Seattle Times’ Education Lab. (Bettina Hansen / The Seattle Times)

Engagement editors help us connect with readers by creating social-media posts, building out our website and planning events for subscribers and the public. Kloub also writes our weekly Ed Lab newsletter.

Kloub explains: “I pay attention to the lifespan and impact of a story beyond when it gets published. I’m listening to readers react to it, listening to community members affected by it and being that middle man between our readers and our reporters.”

Like Gordon and Eng, he’s passionate about his teammates and work. “The Ed Lab team is my favorite part of the job,” Kloub said. “Together we encourage each other to try new things. Our goal is innovation and to find new ways to solve old problems that have persisted for decades.”

Add these three ingredients to our talented stew of Seattle Times reporters, columnists, editors, photographers, videographers, designers and producers and you have something special. Something worth celebrating during the holiday season.