Rain and blustery wind — with possible gusts of 15 to 25 mph — are expected in the Seattle area Monday night through Tuesday morning. "It will move through quickly but could make the morning commute messy," said a forecaster.

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A “vigorous” weather system from the Gulf of Alaska is headed our way.

Don’t panic: It’s not expected to bring battering weather to the Pacific Northwest. However, it will bring rain and blustery wind — with possible gusts of 15 to 25 mph — into the region Monday night through Tuesday morning.

“It will move through quickly but could make the morning commute messy,” said Ted Buehner, a meteorologist with the National Weather Service in Seattle.

It’s a different story for the San Juan Islands and parts of Skagit and Whatcom counties, where a high-wind advisory is in place until noon Tuesday. Gusts could reach 45 to 50 mph.

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For weather watchers along the coast, the system from the gulf will also bring a chance to view “a very nice swell train” that has resulted in 50-foot waves near the Kodiak Islands in Alaska and is expected to bring heavy surf and 18- to 22-foot waves to Washington’s coast Tuesday night. A high-wind advisory there is in place until 4 p.m. Tuesday.

Buehner said the heavy surf may still be “rocking and rolling early Wednesday” but should be viewed from high ground and not the rocky jetties that jut out into the seas.

“They are fun to watch, but do it from a safe distance,” he said.

The flood warnings on a host of area rivers that were issued during last week’s heavy rains have mostly been lifted, according to the Weather Service, though water levels in the White River and the Skokomish River remain elevated.

And while things appear to be drying out for the moment, the threat of landslides remains as “the conditions are still ripe for it and it will take a while for things to slowly but surely dry out,” Buehner said.

In the meantime, there are likely to be sun breaks on Monday with highs in the 50s.