The first full moon of summer, which is traditionally called a Strawberry Moon, will likely have a pink cast and appear unusually large, according to Washington State University astronomers.

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Sky watchers in the Puget Sound area could be in for a sweet treat this week when June’s fat full moon makes a rosy appearance on Wednesday night. If the weather cooperates, that is.

The first full moon of summer, which is traditionally called a Strawberry Moon, will likely have a pink cast and appear unusually large, according to Washington State University astronomers.

What’s more, you won’t have to stay up too late to get a peek, said WSU astronomer Michael Allen in a news release.

The moon will begin to rise in the east-southeast at 8:24 p.m. Pacific Daylight Time and will be at its fullest by 9:53 p.m.

“When low on the horizon, the moon appears redder than what we can typically see, which will be the case Wednesday night,” he explained. The moon will look bigger than usual due to an optical illusion that occurs just as Earth’s satellite begins to rise to the east.

“It’s a trick in our minds that makes the moon seem bigger than it really is. A low moon is no larger than a high moon,” said Allen.

Saturn, which will appear to be at its brightest for the year, will share the spotlight, looking like a bright star just to the south of the full moon.

Should you miss Wednesday’s night-sky show, a nearly full moon may cast a strawberry hue once again Thursday night.