The shutdown of the Alaskan Way Viaduct forced regular users of the elevated highway to find an alternative mode of commuting. And for the most part, the traffic nightmare predicted was largely unfounded.

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Transportation agencies have been applauding commuters who helped reduce traffic congestion during the three-week Highway 99 closure through Seattle by adjusting their work hours, riding the bus, telecommuting or trying anything other than driving alone at peak hours.

The question now is: Will these new routines stick?

The shutdown of the Alaskan Way Viaduct forced regular users of the elevated highway to find an alternative mode of commuting. And for the most part, the traffic nightmare predicted was largely unfounded.

But officials are hoping three weeks was enough to keep those new transit users, bike riders, and carpool groups from reverting to their old ways once the two-mile mile tunnel opens early Monday to replace the viaduct.

“Thank you to the traveling public for the adjustments they’ve made over the past three weeks,” said Heather Marx, downtown mobility director for the Seattle Department of Transportation (SDOT). If you find that the changes that you made work for you, give you a better experience, keep doing them. ”

More than 100 people responded to a Seattle Times call out asking people whether they will continue their viaduct-closure commuting habits even after the tunnel opens. Most respondents said they plan to at least alter their schedules in some way, such as working from home one day per week or biking when weather is favorable.

“I have started to take the Community Transit Express buses a lot more from Edmonds into downtown Seattle. It only takes an extra 10 minutes it seems, and I can read on the top of the double-decker bus,” said Brad Dobbs. “On days where there is no rush or anything to get home, I can see myself using the bus more often. So far, the Community Transit buses are super clean and comfortable.”

Corine Ledridge, who lives in Federal Way, said she shifted her start time at work in downtown Seattle from 8 a.m. to 10 a.m. to miss the worst of the commute, and she likes the new hours.

“I am saving commute time and can now work out in the morning. Arriving later means I get more work done in the same amount of time,” she said because she can avoid coffee, chatting and other distractions and use her time more productively.

Others said, however, that their new routines aren’t likely to last long term.

Lisa Diemert said the nature of her job as a fitness instructor requires her to be out interacting with the community.

Lawrence Hanks said telecommuting was only a temporary agreement with his employer, who usually wants him to be in the office to work and communicate with others.

Mary Rasmussen works as a dietitian at Seattle Cancer Care Alliance in South Lake Union. She sees patients and so she can’t work from home or adjust her hours to fit a better commute schedule.

But she has been riding an electric bike from Ballard at least three days a week during the Highway 99 closure instead of driving alone — adding five to 10 minutes to her trip.

“It’s not as hard as I thought to stay warm and dry, even when weather is not great,” said Rasmussen, who plans to continue bike commuting even after the tunnel opens.

The Highway 99 closure has created some new on-demand transit services.

King County Metro Transit launched Ride2 that uses a private shuttle service to take commuters to the Eastgate park-and-ride in Bellevue and the nonprofit Ride2 Transit to the West Seattle water taxi dock and Alaska Junction buses.

Standard fare is $2.75, but ORCA cardholders can apply that $2.75 as a transfer, to cover a full bus trip or partial water-taxi fare.

Some riders have complained about glitches in the app, which is used to hail a ride, but the service has been largely popular.

“I’ll stick to the new commute so long as King County continues the Ride2 [Transit] service or maintains the new parking near the Water Taxi. It’s proving to be a more reliable commute,” said David Ginsberg.

King County Metro spokesperson Jeff Switzer said the Ride2 program is piloted through the end of December.