Rogoff, now finishing his third year at the agency, survived an investigation into complaints about abrasive management style, profanity and sexism that led to the loss of his 2017 performance bonus.

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Elected officials who oversee Sound Transit are considering an 11 percent pay increase to $364,000 for CEO Peter Rogoff, to rival what other transit-agency executives are paid.

Rogoff, now finishing his third year at the agency, survived an investigation into complaints about abrasive management style, profanity and sexism that led to the loss of his 2017 performance bonus.

Last month the agency’s governing board voted 11-2 to hold contract-renewal talks, after Rogoff completed leadership coaching and a board-supervised performance improvement plan. He is currently paid $328,545, not including any 2018 bonus he might win.

Board Chairman Dave Somers favors a three-year contract for 2019, 2020 and 2021, followed by options for three one-year extensions. Somers, who is Snohomish County executive, said it’s important to keep Rogoff’s skills and continuity available through 2024, when the $3.2 billion Northgate-Shoreline-Lynnwood light-rail extension is to open.

Somers led a three-member committee meeting Monday on the CEO contract, to be followed by another Thursday. A final agreement would be voted by the 18-member board, led by Somers, King County Executive Dow Constantine and Pierce County Executive Bruce Dammeier. Somers said Rogoff has seen the contract provisions but the two haven’t yet discussed whether Rogoff agrees.

New language would emphasize his duty for “promoting and maintaining a work environment that emphasizes collegiality, collaboration and mutual respect to the fullest extent possible.” That language refers to past problems, said the board’s legal consultant, Steve Winterbauer, who wrote the Feb. 28 investigative report.

Board member Nancy Backus, the Auburn mayor, raised another issue — to what extent is Rogoff free to participate in charitable or political activities, when he’s also required to give full time and attention to Sound Transit?

Seattle-area taxpayers spend far more than other regions for transit, and in 2016 voters passed the $54 billion Sound Transit 3 plan, rivaled in ambition only by Los Angeles.

Contract discussions haven’t focused on transit operations and project delivery, where Rogoff shows both hits and misses. The Lynnwood project is a year late, and last year the agency missed on-time schedule goals in light rail, bus and commuter rail.

On the positive side, train service to Northgate remains on pace to begin in 2021, and contractors recently finished digging a Bellevue rail tunnel. Ridership increased 3 percent this year. Rogoff last month announced his plan to solve escalator failures at UW Station, by stair construction and escalator replacements at a cost of more than $20 million.

And Rogoff made multiple trips to Washington, D.C., to advocate for a $1.2 billion federal grant to help fund the Lynnwood light-rail extension, which is close to winning approval.

Julie Honeywell, Sound Transit’s human-resources director, showed a salary comparison to LA Metro CEO Philip Washington at $369,304, Bay Area Rapid Transit General Manager Grace Crunican at $385,369, and Portland Tri-Met General Manager Doug Kelsey at $343,276. (Salary figures were adjusted to reflect Seattle’s cost of living compared to those three cities, said Sound Transit spokesman Geoff Patrick.)  The proposed figure for Rogoff consists of $360,000 base salary and $4,000 for satisfactory work, which could rise if he is rated outstanding.

This story has been changed to give the correct amount of the federal grant being sought for the Lynnwood light-rail extension.