Michael Colmant, a 63-year-old employee at King County International Airport at Boeing Field, was an avid swimmer, cyclist and runner. He raced in several marathons and competed in the Ironman World Championship in Hawaii.

On Sunday evening, Colmant was riding his bicycle along Seward Park Avenue South when a driver heading the opposite direction in his lane struck him head-on and did not stop. He suffered multiple blunt force injuries, the King County Medical Examiner’s Office said Tuesday, and was declared dead upon arriving to the hospital.

No one has been arrested for the hit-and-run death, Seattle police said Wednesday. The car is an older model, silver Nissan Sentra with a broken windshield.


Colmant served the airport for more than two decades, including most recently as its deputy director. Colleagues described him as a mentor and dedicated manager who had high standards for his work while also supporting his staff, both professionally and personally.

“Mike had this warmth to him. He took me under his wing and anytime I walked past his office, he would invite me in to have a conversation and hear my perspective,” said Vanessa Chin, who works in business information management at the airport.

Colmant was particularly encouraging to women and people of color, helping them develop their technical skills, said Raleigh Salazar, who started his career as a mechanic and grew to become a project manager.

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“Mike made me a better leader, a better professional and a better manager,” Salazar said. “He had a very unique way of asking a lot of questions that expanded your mind and your thought process.”

He was most proud of helping repair the main runway at the airport two weeks after the 2001 Nisqually earthquake.

Colmant graduated from the University of British Columbia and held management positions at airports in Canada before coming to King County in 1999.

He was married to Dorie Colmant. The couple had a daughter together, Sydney. He was also stepfather to Candice McAlpine and grandfather to her daughter Kiana.

Colmant would travel to the U.S.-Canadian border each week during the pandemic to visit Sydney, who lives her mother in Abbotsford, British Columbia.

Sydney remembers her dad teaching her to surf and snorkel in Hawaii and roaming around towns during their travel, drinking coffee and listening to music.

“He was truly an amazing man and we miss him so much,” Sydney said.