Impromptu folk performances at the Léger household in Shoreline are not unusual for this self-described family of music geeks.

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Sketched May 20, 2015

Impromptu folk performances at the Léger household in Shoreline are not unusual for the self-described family of music geeks.

Dejah is playing the guitar and singing a traditional French-Canadian tune, while her husband, Devon, accompanies on the violin, and her father-in-law, Louis, operates a “crankie,” an illustrated panorama brought to life by a hand crank, that tells the story of a little rabbit hiding in a cabbage.

Dejah, a leading force in the local community of crankie artists, started incorporating this old visual-art form into her musical act to help non-French-speaking kids and adults engage with her songs in a different way. “Music and images make each other more powerful,” she said.

Her home studio is taken over by rolled-up scrolls — some as long as 30 feet — and piles of construction paper she uses to create the intricate cut-out illustrations that have been captivating audiences since she launched a career as a crankie artist three years ago.

The Légers and others perform during Saturday’s Crankie Showcase at the Folklife Festival (Center Theater, 2 p.m. at the Seattle Armory).