Frustration is growing among friends and family who want to find Nancy Moyer, a 36-year-old mother of two who vanished March 6, leaving her car, purse, wallet, credit cards and identification behind at her Tenino, Thurston County, home.

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Frustration is growing among friends and family who want to find Nancy Moyer, a 36-year-old mother of two who vanished March 6, leaving her car, purse, wallet, credit cards and identification behind at her Tenino, Thurston County, home.

“We kind of feel we’re getting to the end of what contributions we can make,” said her husband, Bill Moyer, of the fliers for his wife and the Web site devoted to finding her. “It kind of feels like we’re beyond our ability to help at this point.”

The Thurston County Sheriff’s Office, which is leading the investigation into Moyer’s disappearance, had no news about the investigation Wednesday.

Thurston County Chief Criminal Deputy James Chamberlain said investigators have no new leads that might help locate her.

Chamberlain said the investigation is active and ongoing, but “there are no easy answers so far.”

Bill and Nancy Moyer, who are separated, share custody of their two daughters, Samantha, 9, and Amanda, 11. He said that he went to an after-school parent-teacher conference for Amanda at Tenino Elementary School alone Wednesday. Ordinarily, he and his wife both would be present, he said.

“It’s hard going through these things we normally would do together,” he said.

Sheriff’s spokesman Lt. Chris Mealy and friends of Nancy Moyer have said that the couple have an amicable relationship after separating about two years ago.

Chamberlain said investigators do not know whether a crime has occurred. Detectives have not been able to rule out that she went somewhere without telling anyone or left her residence and had some kind of medical emergency.

After her disappearance, Moyer’s white Honda was parked outside her home, and Mealy has said that no toiletries or clothing appeared to be missing.

Matthew Vandrush, who works with Moyer at the state Department of Ecology, has said that she is the type of person who’d call in to work if she was going to be three minutes late. As of Wednesday, Moyer had missed a week and a half of work without calling in.

Moyer has worked as a financial analyst at Ecology’s accounting department in Lacey for 12 years.

Vandrush, a close friend of Moyer’s, was one of the last people to see her; he carpooled with her and she dropped him off at home after work March 6. Later that evening, a clerk at Dave’s Thriftway in Tenino has confirmed that Moyer purchased some items from the store that night. Detectives have a copy of the check she wrote.

“It’s very frustrating,” Vandrush said during a phone interview Wednesday back at work, where Moyer’s desk sits empty. “No one knows what to do. … No one even knows whether they should be grieving at this point.”

Vandrush and his wife, Betsy Borgacz, have set up a site with Nancy Moyer’s photo at www.nancymoyer.com. Vandrush said he and other volunteers have put up missing-person fliers with Nancy Moyer’s photo at restaurants and shopping centers all over Thurston County and as far south as Mount St. Helens.

Chamberlain confirmed that investigators have interviewed staff members who work with Moyer at Ecology.

“Right now, we’re just talking to everybody and anybody that had a relationship with her,” he said.