Michael Stanley, a 49-year-old U.S. citizen, was charged Monday with first-degree burglary with sexual motivation and second-degree rape in connection with an attack on a 69-year-old woman for whom he had done landscaping work last year.

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A violent sex offender who made headlines by cutting off his electronic monitoring bracelet and fleeing Canada for Seattle in 2013 is accused of raping a 69-year-old woman in her Skyway home.

Michael Stanley, a 49-year-old U.S. citizen, was charged Monday with first-degree burglary with sexual motivation and second-degree rape in connection with the attack last weekend. He is being held in jail in lieu of $1 million bail.

The alleged victim had first met Stanley when she hired him to do landscaping work last year, according to charging documents.

Stanley is alleged to have shown up at the woman’s house around 10 p.m. Friday asking for additional work. The woman thought he was drunk and turned him away, the charging documents say.

Later that night or early the next morning, a naked Stanley “showed up in her bedroom” and raped her, charging documents said.

The woman told King County sheriff’s deputies she complied because she feared he would kill her, according to the charges.

After the attack, Stanley told her to take a shower, according to charging documents. He then allegedly told the victim he needed to go to detox and she offered to help him get there the next day if he needed a ride, the documents allege.

Stanley returned to the woman’s house at 8 a.m. Saturday. The woman called a friend, who advised her to dial 911, the charges said.

A sheriff’s deputy found Stanley about two blocks from the woman’s home, according to the charges.

When talking with sheriff’s investigators, Stanley initially denied any sexual contact had occurred, the documents stated. He then allegedly blamed the woman for being “flirty,” the charges said.

Deputies found the woman’s sweatpants in his backpack, the court papers say.

Senior Deputy Prosecutor Carla Carlstrom also added the element of “rapid recidivism” to each of the charges. The charging factor is used by prosecutors in cases when a new crime is alleged to occur soon after a person is released from jail or prison, said Mark Larson, chief of staff for King County Prosecutor Dan Satterberg.

Stanley, who is homeless, had been released from prison on Feb. 21 after being convicted of second-degree burglary, Carlstrom wrote in charging papers. That conviction stemmed from a December break-in at Stafford Healthcare, a nursing home in Des Moines.

He was found just before 2 a.m. in the employee break lounge wearing an employee badge with the name Maureen on it, Carlstrom wrote.

When employees dialed 911, Stanley left armed with two 4-inch steak knives in his hand, the charges said. When police found him nearby, the officer had to shoot him with a Taser to get him to comply, Carlstrom wrote.

Carlstrom called Stanley “an extreme threat to community safety.”

Casa Latina, the Seattle-based immigrant services and labor agency, confirmed Stanley had worked at the alleged victim’s home in spring 2014 through its work-placement program. Casa Latina said Stanley had completed the agency’s registration and training for work dispatch.

He discontinued involvement with Casa Latina in April 2014, the agency said.

Stanley has an extensive history of sexual assaults and other crimes in Canada.

In 1987, he broke into the apartment of an 82-year-old Lethbridge, Alberta, woman who used a wheelchair and raped her, according to the Canadian Broadcasting Corp. (CBC). The same night, he was discovered in another apartment with two young girls, including a 15-month-old who had been undressed, the CBC said.

He also was charged with sexually assaulting a young girl in 2004, but according to the CBC she delayed reporting the incident and eventually refused to testify because she was afraid of Stanley.

In 2013, while under supervision after his release from prison for kidnapping two mentally impaired boys from a playground in Alberta, he cut off an electronic monitoring bracelet and fled.

Edmonton police issued a warrant for his arrest, and Canadian law-enforcement officials said U.S. Customs and Border Protection were notified that he might be attempting to enter the U.S., which he did at the Blaine border crossing Oct. 7.

U.S. Customs officials said they could not arrest Stanley, a U.S. citizen, on the Canadian warrant, which could not be served in this country.

After he crossed the border, Canada said that it wouldn’t seek extradition.

After Seattle law enforcement learned Stanley had moved to the city, he was ordered to register with the King County Sheriff’s Office as a sex offender. He did so just days before he was arrested for an incident in West Seattle.

That arrest stemmed from a report of a man yelling in an alley. A neighbor told officers that Stanley threatened him after he asked Stanley to quiet down, a Seattle police report said.

Officers said Stanley was belligerent and “actively resisted” their commands, according to the report. After his arrest, officers confiscated a small lock-blade knife, a flashlight, a screwdriver and pliers from Stanley, according to the report.

After Stanley’s arrest, police said he also had been involved in the sexual assault of a 16-year-old boy in West Seattle. However, Stanley was not charged with the alleged sexual assault because of lack of evidence.

In January 2014, Stanley pleaded guilty to misdemeanor charges of harassment and resisting arrest in Seattle Municipal Court. He was sentenced to 364 days in jail, with 154 days suspended. He also was given credit for time served. Authorities said he would serve only about two months behind bars.

Sheriff’s spokesman Sgt. B.J. Myers said that Stanley is a registered level 3 sex offender who has complied with the requirements of his sex-offender registry by checking in with the Sheriff’s Office weekly. Level 3 sex offenders have been deemed the highest risk to reoffend, according to the Sheriff’s Office.

The only times he didn’t report were when he was in jail or prison, Myers said Monday.