The Seattle Times won 10 C.B. Blethen memorial awards for stories on diversity, breaking news, investigations and more.

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The Seattle Times won 10 C.B. Blethen memorial awards — including two first-place nods — for reporting on diversity issues, breaking news, investigations and more.

The Oregonian won seven awards.

The awards were established in 1977 in honor of C.B. Blethen, publisher of The Seattle Times for 26 years, from 1915 to 1941. The awards, sponsored by The Seattle Times and administered by the Pacific Northwest Newspaper Association, honor reporters from newspapers in two circulation divisions (over 50,000 circulation and under 50,000 circulation).

Here’s a full list of 2016 winners:

Distinguished Coverage of Diversity

Division A

1st Place: The Seattle Times, “A series of stories on diversity,” by Times staff

Coverage included:

2nd Place: The Oregonian, “Lost in Transition,” by Casey Parks

3rd Place: The Seattle Times, “Diversity stories,” by Nina Shapiro

Division B

1st Place: The Daily Herald, “What jail can’t cure,” by Diana Hefley

2nd Place: Yakima Herald-Republic, “Growing up different in Yakima,” by Herald-Republic staff

3rd Place: The (Vancouver) Columbian, “Striving for diversity, not animosity,” by Emily Gillespie

Deadline Reporting

Division A

1st Place: The Oregonian, “Umpqua Community College shooting breaking news blog,” by The Oregonian/OregonLive staff

2nd Place: The Seattle Times, “Ride the Ducks crash,” by Times staff

3rd Place: The Oregonian, “Burns occupation,” by The Oregonian staff

Division B

1st Place: The (Centralia) Chronicle, ‘Truly Tragic’: Community Reeling After Children Killed in Fire, by Chronicle staff

2nd Place: The Columbian, “Tornado hits Battle Ground,” by Columbian staff

3rd Place: The Chronicle, “Flooding Strikes All Area Rivers,” by Chronicle staff

Investigative Reporting

Division A

1st Place: The Oregonian, “Portland’s toxic air,” by Rob Davis

2nd Place: The Seattle Times, “Minorities exploited by Warren Buffett’s mobile home empire,” by Mike Baker, The Seattle Times, and Daniel Wagner, BuzzFeed

3rd Place: The (Tacoma) News Tribune, “Lindquist investigation series,” by Sean Robinson

Division B

1st Place: The Columbian, “The affordable housing crisis in Clark County,” by Patty Hastings

2nd Place: Idaho Press-Tribune, “Idaho rape kit series,” by Ruth Brown

3rd Place: The Daily Herald, “Drunken man left under bridge,” by Rikki King

Enterprise Reporting

Division A

1st Place: The Seattle Times, “Unsettled: Immigrants search for their ‘forever’ homes in Seattle,” by Tyrone Beason

2nd Place: The Oregonian, “Dying Alone,” by Rebecca Woolington

3rd Place: The Seattle Times, “A Season of Drought,” by Hal Bernton and Steve Ringman

Division B

1st Place: The Daily Herald, “I needed to do this,” by Daily Herald staff

2nd Place: The Daily Herald, “What Jail Can’t Cure,” by Diana Hefley

3rd Place: The Chronicle, “Lewis County: Highs and Hopes,” by Chronicle staff

Feature Writing

Division A

1st Place: The Oregonian, “Niko’s voice,” by Tom Hallman Jr.

2nd Place: The Seattle Times, “‘This has got to change’: Women game developers fight sexism in industry,” by Susan Kelleher

3rd Place: The Seattle Times, “Seattle’s party people find connections in hidden hot spots,” by Tyrone Beason

Division B

1st Place: Yakima Herald-Republic, “Survivor (Andy Stepniewski),” by Scott Sandsberry

2nd Place: Lewiston Tribune, “What impact football?” by Dale Grummert

3rd Place: The Columbian, “Press Talk: Fear and loathing in Crazytown,” by Lou Brancaccio

Debby Lowman Contest for Distinguished Reporting of Consumer Affairs

Division A

1st Place: The Oregonian, “Grocery Savings,” by Grant Butler

2nd Place: The Seattle Times, “Consumer safety in legal marijuana,” by Bob Young

3rd Place: The Seattle Times, “War on Cars,” by Brier Dudley

Division B

1st Place: The Daily Herald, “What to Expect,” by Andrea Brown and Quinn Russell Brown

2nd Place: The Daily Herald, “A new angle on mammograms,” by Sharon Salyer

3rd Place: The Columbian, “Live Well Series,” by Marissa Harshman