Seattle Public Utilities wants to raise residential garbage, sewage and drainage rates 12 percent by 2015. The following year, garbage rates would climb another 1.6 percent.

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Seattle Public Utilities wants to raise residential garbage, sewage and drainage rates 12 percent by 2015. The following year, garbage rates would climb another 1.6 percent.

In each of the next three years, the monthly costs for a typical home would increase an average of $4.17. That means charges would go from $104.73 this year to $117.25 in 2015 for a typical residential customer.

The monthly bill for a downtown hotel would go up from $14,130 to $14,844. The rates for a large restaurant would rise from $3,121 to $3,295.

The proposed increases were sent to the Seattle City Council this week and will be considered during budget deliberations in the fall.

Seattle Public Utilities (SPU) officials say the increases are needed to pay for major capital investments, including building new waste-transfer stations and reducing chronic sewer overflows and polluted stormwater runoff.

“With the tough economy, many of our customers, both residents and businesses, continue to operate on tight budgets and understandably expect the same fiscal discipline from local government,” SPU Director Ray Hoffman said. “We are committed to keeping our rate proposal as low as possible while maintaining our ability to deliver critical utility services.”

According to a breakdown provided by the utility, wastewater makes up about 41 percent of the total residential bill, garbage 34 percent and drainage 25 percent.

Earlier this month, the City Council approved an agreement with federal and state regulators to clean up chronic overflows of raw sewage and stormwater into Puget Sound and other waterways.

The utility estimates it will spend about $500 million on construction projects over the next 13 years to carry out the agreement, including large underground storage tanks.

The utility in May opened a new $50 million recycling, composting and garbage-disposal facility in South Park.

A second, $52 million transfer station in Wallingford is planned to open in 2016.

Seattle’s other transfer stations were built before the city adopted curbside recycling and had limited space to sort materials or offer them for reuse.

While the drainage, sewage and garbage rates are going up, the rate at which they’re rising is less than the previous hikes. Bills jumped about 23 percent between 2010 and 2012. Since 2009, the typical residential charges for the three services have gone from $84.27 to a projected $117.25 in 2015, an increase of 39 percent.

Last year, the City Council approved a 23 percent increase in water rates through 2014.

The largest commercial customers saw increases of more than 30 percent.

SPU’s Hoffman said the increases were needed to replace aging infrastructure and meet stringent federal requirements for drinking-water quality. The city is in the process of covering its open reservoirs.

The utility says it’s trying to make its operations more efficient. It eliminated 85 positions and cut $56.5 million in capital spending over the past three years, Hoffman said.

Under the current proposal, another 10 jobs would be cut and some flood-control projects and other construction postponed.

Hoffman estimated the savings from those measures to be $29 million over the next three years.

Earlier this month Seattle City Light also announced that it was seeking rate increases of 31 percent over the next six years. That proposal also must be approved by the City Council.

Lynn Thompson: 206-464-8305 or lthompson@seattletimes.com.

On Twitter @lthompsontimes.