Officials set up checkpoints and closed routes into the Malheur National Wildlife Refuge in Eastern Oregon, where anti-government activists have been occupying a building to protest federal control of land.

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State law-enforcement and FBI officials on Wednesday morning set up checkpoints and closed routes from Highway 205 into the Malheur National Wildlife Refuge in Eastern Oregon, where anti-government activists have been occupying a building to protest federal control of land.

Resident ranchers who live in homes inside the checkpoint area are allowed through if they show identification, but others are being turned away.

Wes Land, who lives in the town of Burns, was turned away when he tried to go to a ranch near the refuge where he was supposed to feed cattle.

“They’re not letting anyone through,” he said.

Standoff in Oregon

A law-enforcement official at one of the checkpoints said that everyone remaining at the refuge has been asked to leave. Those individuals were being asked to show identification and told their vehicles would be subject to search, according to a statement released by law enforcement.

Some reporters, including Joe Douglass of KATU of Portland, headed for the occupied refuge headquarters before the checkpoints were set up.

Douglass told The Seattle Times that the road to the refuge headquarters was blocked by a piece of heavy equipment set up by the occupiers.

Douglass said he spoke early Wednesday with one of the militants, Jason Patrick, who said those remaining at the refuge planned to stay until the occupation’s demands were met. Those demands have included the transfer of the refuge to local control and the release of two Harney County ranchers now serving five years in federal prison for arson.

A leader in the occupation, Ammon Bundy, was arrested Tuesday along with other protesters after a shooting.