Record-setting rains drenched Western Washington over the weekend, forcing many to swap their tank tops and flip-flops for jackets and umbrellas...

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Record-setting rains drenched Western Washington over the weekend, forcing many to swap their tank tops and flip-flops for jackets and umbrellas and keeping many away from summer festivals.

By late Sunday night, 0.44 inch of rain had fallen at the National Weather Service’s Seattle Weather Forecast Office at Sand Point, breaking the record for the date of 0.23 inch set in 1992.

A spokeswoman for the Bite of Seattle estimated attendance at this year’s festival would be around 300,000, compared with 450,000 in a normal year.

“Our attendance is going to be a little down on account of the weather,” spokeswoman Cindy Stohr said.

Hoquiam also set a rainfall record with 0.75 inch falling by late Sunday night. Four recording sites, including Seattle-Tacoma International Airport, set records Saturday.

At Sea-Tac, 0.28 inch of rain had fallen by late Sunday, still shy of the record for the date of 0.33 inch set in 1952.

This is already the 10th-wettest July on record for Sea-Tac.

“Our normal rainfall for all of July is 0.79, and we’ve already surpassed that by more than a half-inch,” said Johnny Burg, a meteorologist with the National Weather Service.

With more than a week to go in July, Sea-Tac has received 1.41 inch of rain this month, he said.

Another five-hundredths of an inch would tie this month with July 1954 for ninth-wettest, Burg said.

But that record is looking safer than it did a few days ago. After a chance of showers this morning, the Seattle area is headed back to drier weather, Burg said. Temperatures today may be in the mid-70s.

In Mason County, a flood warning for the Skokomish River was in effect until just before noon Sunday. The river crested at 15.9 feet Sunday morning — 16 feet is considered flood stage — but had fallen to 15.37 feet by 3:15 p.m. and was forecast to continue dropping.

“We had a pretty potent system that came in that had tropical moisture with it and brought some pretty good rains to some areas,” Burg said. “Some places on the southeast side of the Olympics, like Cushman Dam, got about 4 inches of rain and some places in the North Cascades, like the Mount Baker ski area, got around about 3 inches.”

Locations setting rainfall records Saturday included:

• Sea-Tac airport with 0.29 inch, breaking the previous record of 0.27 set in 1963.

• Quillayute Airport with 1.60 inch, breaking the 0.27-inch record set in 1997.

• Hoquiam with 0.99 inch of rain Saturday, breaking the 0.75 record set in 1963.

• Sand Point in Seattle with 0.22 inch, breaking the 0.02 record set in 1993.

Staff reporter Drew DeSilver contributed to this report. Judy Chia Hui Hsu: 206-464-3315