Senators Patty Murray and Maria Cantwell are among nine female Democratic senators to call on Sen. Al Franken to resign after another woman accused him of sexual misconduct.

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Washington Sens. Patty Murray and Maria Cantwell are among nine female Democratic senators to call Wednesday on Sen. Al Franken of Minnesota to resign after another woman accused him of sexual misconduct.

In a series of tweets Wednesday morning, Murray said she was “shocked and appalled by Senator Franken’s behavior,” and that “It’s time for him to step aside.” She ended the string saying, “It’s time for us as elected representatives to hold ourselves to a higher standard, to set an example and to live a set of values that is truly representative and worthy of the Congress, our democracy, and our great country.”

Cantwell joined the increasing pressure on Franken to resign with a tweet saying, “Senator Franken’s actions are disturbing, egregious, and demonstrate a pattern of serious misconduct and abuse. It is time for Senator Franken to resign from office.”

Allegations of sexual misconduct

Since The New York Times published allegations of sexual harassment and assault against Hollywood mogul Harvey Weinstein in October, multiple men in Hollywood, politics and media have faced allegations ranging from sexual misconduct to rape. Here's a list of some of the people who have been accused.

How have sexual harassment and the #MeToo conversation affected you?

We want to hear your thoughts. Whether you work in tech, government, media, finance, the arts or another field, has sexual harassment or sexism affected you or the culture you work in? Are you becoming more cautious with co-workers or other people in your life?  

The senators who joined in urging Franken to resign are: Kirsten Gillibrand of New York, Claire McCaskill of Missouri, Kamala Harris of California, Mazie Hirono of Hawaii, Maggie Hassan of New Hampshire, Debbie Stabenow of Michigan and Tammy Baldwin of Wisconsin. Four male Democratic senators joined the call: Sherrod Brown of Ohio and Bob Casey of Pennsylvania, Richard Durbin of Illinois and Joe Donnelly of Indiana.

At a news conference Gillibrand, who penned a Facebook post about why Franken should resign, said, “I think that it would be better for the country for him to offer that clear message that he values women. That we value women and that this kind of behavior is not acceptable.”

Franken’s office says he will have an announcement Thursday. Franken has been accused of making unwanted advances and touching women without their consent. He has said he didn’t intentionally do anything wrong and has issued an apology.