Ed Murray’s spokesman says a subpoena suggesting Seattle police and others are involved in cover-up efforts regarding a June 24 incident at the mayor’s house is “outlandish.”

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A Seattle police response to the home of Mayor Ed Murray involving an unidentified man last year has become the latest point of contention in a Kent man’s lawsuit accusing Murray of sexual abuse 30 years ago.

Lawyers representing Delvonn Heckard publicized a subpoena filed Monday suggesting Seattle Police Chief Kathleen O’Toole and Maggie Thompson, one of Murray’s staff members, are “involved in cover-up efforts” regarding the police response to a “suspicious person” report at the mayor’s Capitol Hill home on the night of June 24.

A spokesman for Murray fired back late Monday, calling the subpoena “outlandish” and completely unrelated to the lawsuit.

“The gossipy account provided is an example of unfounded rumor being peddled as fact. It is easily disproved by numerous eyewitnesses, and by the official police record,” Jeff Reading said in an emailed statement.

Ed Murray investigation

The mayor also released a statement from five people who said they were guests at Murray’s home that night. They contradicted an anonymous allegation in the subpoena that claimed the police call was in response to a “shirtless man” who’d left belongings inside the mayor’s house.

Attorneys Julie Kays and Lincoln Beauregard subpoenaed Thompson, Murray’s operations manager and 2013 campaign manager, who was at the house that night. They want Thompson to provide any information she has related to the call and to three men now accusing the mayor of past sexual abuse.

The lawyers’ contentions are based on information Beauregard says comes from an anonymous tipster, who provided them with screen shots of the police log documenting the call.

The court filing contains screen shots of a partial Seattle Police computer-assisted dispatch (CAD) report showing eight officers were dispatched after Murray called O’Toole at 11:23 p.m., saying he “needs police ASAP as unk (unknown) person was on his front door.” O’Toole contacted a dispatcher.

The CAD report, which documented the police’s response to the call, indicates that at 11:27 p.m. O’Toole reported everything was under control.

“Per Chief O’Toole: Mayor said ‘Maggie’ is there now,” the entry states. “Everything is UC. Not to rush. Per Chief, Mayor sounded a little confused. She req’d (requested) officers still check on him.”

Neither O’Toole nor Thompson responded to calls seeking interviews Monday. Seattle police released a statement and a redacted version of the CAD log late Monday. Officers cleared the call without writing a report, the log shows.

“What I want to know is, what’s the mayor’s campaign manager doing at a call like this and why is the chief of police directly involved in the dialogue,” Beauregard said in an interview.

He said the apparent lack of a report suggests police were trying to keep the incident under wraps.

During an unrelated news conference Monday, Murray said he has called police to his home on occasion because of suspicious individuals.

“We have had incidents where people have tried to enter our house. We have called our security unit … when those incidents have happened. No one has actually ever physically been able to enter the house,” he said.

The five people who said they were at Murray’s house that night, Lyle Canceko, Joe Loeffler, Adrian Matanza, Roger Nyhus and Thompson, said they’d returned there after a Pride Month event on Capitol Hill.

Their statement said they were enjoying a glass of wine when someone knocked on the door. Two people, “both wearing shirts,” asked to use the bathroom and phone and “grew slightly pushy” when refused.

The two left, and Murray called O’Toole, triggering her request for police response. The statement by Murray’s friends said the couple never entered the house and “the night ended peacefully.”

Heckard, 46, who sued the mayor earlier this month, alleges Murray sexually abused him as a teenager three decades ago. Two other men, Jeff Simpson and Lloyd Anderson, also have said Murray sexually abused them as teenagers while living in Portland in the early 1980s. They have not filed lawsuits.

All three accusers have acknowledged living troubled lives marked by drug abuse, criminal records and prison time. Murray has denied all of the men’s accusations, claiming they are politically motivated.