Less than a month after Seattle sued President Donald Trump over his “sanctuary cities” executive order, a federal judge in San Francisco has blocked the order. Seattle will now review that ruling, which will inform the city’s next steps in its own suit, Murray said.

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Less than a month after Seattle sued President Donald Trump over his executive order cracking down on so-called “sanctuary cities,” a federal judge in San Francisco on Tuesday blocked any attempt by Trump to withhold funding from such cities.

U.S. District Judge William Orrick issued the preliminary injunction in a case that combines lawsuits brought by San Francisco and Santa Clara County.

The California lawsuits, like Seattle’s suit but filed earlier and with some differences in scope, target Trump’s executive order against communities that limit their own involvement in federal immigration enforcement.

It’s not completely clear whether the Trump administration considers Seattle a sanctuary city.

In statements Tuesday, Seattle Mayor Ed Murray called Orrick’s ruling “yet another rebuke of (Trump’s) misguided agenda” and City Councilmember M. Lorena González said the ruling “proves once again that when cities stand with their immigrant and refugee communities, they win.”

Seattle’s lawyers are reviewing the ruling, which will inform the city’s next steps in its own suit, Murray said.

Murray refers to Seattle as a sanctuary city because of an ordinance barring city employees from inquiring about a person’s immigration status, unless required by law or court order.

Police officers can ask about a person’s status when they have reason to believe a person has previously been deported and is committing or has committed a felony.

U.S. Attorney General Jeff Sessions has specifically spoken out against communities, such as King and Snohomish counties, which reject at least some requests from federal immigration authorities to hold people in jail for possible deportation beyond when they would otherwise be released.

San Francisco’s lawsuit is broader in scope than Seattle’s because San Francisco operates a jail. Because Seattle doesn’t manage a jail, it doesn’t receive hold requests.

King County prohibits the Sheriff’s Office and Public Health Department from conditioning services based on an individual’s immigration status.

County Executive Dow Constantine said Tuesday the county “will remain a welcoming place, regardless of the actions of this administration.”