There will be at least two new faces on the Seattle City Council this year — and Sally Bagshaw and Mike O'Brien were comfortably leading Round One of their respective races to fill the open seats.

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There will be at least two new faces on the Seattle City Council this year — and Sally Bagshaw and Mike O’Brien were comfortably leading Round One of their respective races to fill the open seats.

Early results show Bagshaw with nearly three times as many votes as her closest competitor, David Bloom, in the race for council Position 4. O’Brien likewise had nearly twice as many votes as his closest competitor, Robert Rosencrantz, in the race for Position 8.

The top two vote-getters from each race will face off in the November election.

In the third council race, three-term incumbent Nick Licata appeared to be facing down his first serious re-election challenge from Jessie Israel, 35. Licata had just more than half the total vote while Israel was second with about 30 percent. Both will advance to November.

There were eleven candidates running for the two seats left open after Jan Drago stepped down to run for mayor and Richard McIver decided not to run again.

O’Brien, 41, is a former head of the local Sierra Club chapter and the former chief financial officer of a downtown law firm. O’Brien was the only candidate in his race who opposes a deep-bore tunnel to replace the Alaskan Way Viaduct. Mike McGinn, who was leading in a tight three-way race for mayor, also opposes the tunnel.

“It’s going to be really interesting to see how much money jumps into this race and the mayor’s race from people who are supporting the tunnel,” O’Brien said. “It’s going to be a classic battle between powerful, connected interests and the people of Seattle.”

Rosencrantz, 53, is an apartment-building owner and manager.

Bagshaw, 58, the former head of the King County Prosecutor’s Office Civil Division, said an “amazing” campaign team and her support for affordable housing, jobs, and public transportation led to her early success Tuesday.

Her likely opponent, Bloom, 67, is a housing advocate and deputy director of the Church Council of Greater Seattle.

Emily Heffter: 206-464-8246 or eheffter@seattletimes.com