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WASHINGTON — Here’s how the state’s 12 members of Congress voted on major issues during the week ending Sept. 19.

House

Audit of Federal Reserve

By a vote of 333 for and 92 against, the House on Sept. 17 passed a bill (HR 24) authorizing the Government Accountability Office, the investigative arm of Congress, to conduct a top-to-bottom audit of the Federal Reserve Board of Governors and the 12 regional Federal Reserve Banks, with authority to inspect internal communications among Fed governors and staff. Established in 1913 as both an independent agency and central bank, the Fed is charged with setting U.S. monetary policy, with fiscal policy left to the legislative and executive branches. This bill would inject politicians directly into internal Fed deliberations over matters such as setting interest rates and regulating the currency supply.

Voting yes: Suzan DelBene, D-Medina; Rick Larsen, D-Lake Stevens; Jaime Herrera Beutler, R-Camas; Doc Hastings, R-Pasco; Cathy McMorris Rodgers, R-Spokane; Derek Kilmer, D-Gig Harbor; Dave Reichert, R-Auburn; Adam Smith, D-Bellevue

Voting no: Jim McDermott, D-Seattle; Denny Heck, D-Olympia

Support of Syrian rebels

The House on Sept. 17 voted, 273 for and 156 against, to authorize the U.S. government to train and arm moderate Syrian rebels in their battle against the militant group known as the Islamic State. The amendment was added to a measure (HJ Res 124, below) that would fund the federal government on a stopgap basis between the start of fiscal 2015 on Oct. 1 And Dec. 11.

Voting yes: DelBene, Larsen, Herrera Beutler, Hastings, McMorris Rodgers, Kilmer, Reichert, Smith, Heck

Voting no: McDermott

Stopgap spending, Middle East war

Voting 319 for and 108 against, the House on Sept. 17 passed a stopgap measure (HJ Res 124, above) to fund government operations between Oct. 1 and Dec. 11 at an annual rate of $1.012 trillion in discretionary spending while authorizing U.S. training and arming of moderate Syrian rebels.

Voting yes: DelBene, Larsen, Herrera Beutler, Hastings, McMorris Rodgers, Kilmer, Reichert, Smith, Heck

Voting no: McDermott

Democratic policy goals

By a vote of 199 for and 228 against, the House on Sept. 17 turned back a bid by Democrats to add five of their policy goals to HJ Res 124 (above). The motion called for raising the federal minimum wage, requiring that women receive equal pay for equal work, allowing most student loans to be refinanced, denying government contracts to companies that move headquarters overseas and reauthorizing the Export-Import Bank for the long term.

Voting yes: DelBene, Larsen, Kilmer, McDermott, Smith, Heck

Voting no: Herrera Beutler, Hastings, McMorris Rodgers, Reichert

Republican energy package

By a vote of 226 to 191, members on Sept. 18 approved a package (HR 2) of 19 GOP-drafted energy bills that previously cleared the House as stand-alone measures before faltering in the Democratic-controlled Senate in the face of environmental concerns and other objections. In part, the bills would expand offshore drilling for oil and natural gas, require speedy administration approval of the Keystone XL pipeline, expedite Department of Energy approvals of applications for exporting liquefied natural gas and prohibit federal regulation on federal and tribal lands of hydraulic fracturing, or fracking.

Voting yes: Herrera Beutler, Hastings, McMorris Rodgers, Reichert

Voting no: DelBene, Larsen, Kilmer, McDermott, Smith, Heck

Oil exports to terrorism-enablers

The House on Sept. 18 defeated, 193 to 222, a Democratic motion that sought to amend HR 2 (above) so that it would “prohibit U.S. oil exports to any country, company or individual that supports or harbors terrorist organizations, including ISIS or al-Qaida.”

Voting yes: DelBene, Larsen, Kilmer, McDermott, Smith, Heck

Voting no: Herrera Beutler, Hastings, McMorris Rodgers, Reichert

Republican economy package

By a vote of 253 for and 163 against, the House on Sept. 18 approved a package (HR 4) of 15 jobs bills that previously passed as individual measures, and then died in the Democratic-led Senate. In part, the bills would expedite logging in national forests, scale back the 2010 Dodd-Frank financial-regulation law, make bonus depreciation and certain charitable contributions by businesses a permanent part of the U.S. tax code, ease certain environmental rules to promote job creation and give Congress veto power over federal regulations having at least a $100 million annual impact on the economy.

Voting yes: Herrera Beutler, Hastings, McMorris Rodgers, Reichert

Voting no: DelBene, Larsen, Kilmer, McDermott, Smith, Heck

Democrats’ tax changes

Voting 191 to 218, the House on Sept. 18 defeated a motion by Democrats to amend HR 4 (above) in a way that would deny federal tax breaks to companies that shift U.S. jobs overseas or which reincorporate abroad to avoid U.S. taxation, a process known as “inversion.” The motion also sought to require the Republican leadership to put Democratic issues such as a minimum-wage increase, pay equity for women and student-loan refinancing to House votes.

Voting yes: DelBene, Larsen, Kilmer, McDermott, Smith, Heck

Voting no: Herrera Beutler, Hastings, McMorris Rodgers, Reichert

Senate

Female-male pay equity

By a vote of 52 for and 40 against, the Senate on Sept. 15 failed to reach 60 votes to end GOP blockage of a Democratic-sponsored bill (S 2199) closing loopholes in the 1963 Equal Pay Act and giving women more legal tools for gaining pay equity with male co-workers. The so-called Paycheck Fairness Act would require equal pay for comparable work except when differences can be justified by narrowly defined business necessities or factors such as education, training or experience. The bill would prevent employer retaliation against those who inquire about co-workers’ wages or disclose their own pay in the course of investigations. Additionally, the bill would make it easier for plaintiffs to file class-action suits and enable them to seek punitive and compensatory damages.

Voting yes: Maria Cantwell, D; Patty Murray, D

Stopgap spending, Middle East war

By a vote of 73 to 22, the Senate on Sept. 18 passed a measure (HJ Res 124, above) to fund U.S. government operations for the first 10 weeks of fiscal 2015 at an annual rate of $1.012 trillion in discretionary spending. Although the measure authorizes U.S. training and arming of moderate Syrian rebels, there was no separate Senate vote on that issue. The bill extends the Export-Import Bank through June 30, 2015, increases funding for veterans’ health care and provides new funds for aiding Ukraine and countering the spread of the Ebola virus in West Africa.

Voting yes: Cantwell, Murray