The election comes amid an illegal payout scandal at the Port, and the departure of a CEO charged with ethical lapses. The commissioners will have to hire a new CEO and could enact reforms aimed at increasing public trust.

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King County voters have narrowed the field of 15 candidates running for three Port of Seattle commission seats, including a pair of incumbents looking to stay on the board amid a series of public-trust controversies.

The top two vote-getters in each of the three Port races advance to the November general election. The winners receive four-year terms starting in January, overseeing Seattle-Tacoma International Airport, local marinas and other properties.

The election comes amid an illegal payout scandal at the Port, and the departure of a CEO charged with ethical lapses. The commissioners will have to hire a new CEO and could enact reforms aimed at increasing public trust.

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Here are the results released Tuesday night by race — each position is an at-large, countywide seat.

Position 1

Longtime commissioner John Creighton was in first place, with 35 percent of early returns. Small-business owner Ryan Calkins was also in the top two, with 28.1 percent.

Trailing were engineer Bea Querido-Rico, at 20.8 percent, and former state legislator Claudia Kauffman, at 15.6 percent.

Position 3

Commissioner Stephanie Bowman was cruising with 55.1 percent of the vote. Ahmed Abdi, an outreach manager for the Fair Work Center, was comfortably in second, with 27.8 percent.

Lisa Espinosa, who works in customer service at Puget Sound Energy, looked to be headed toward elimination with 16 percent.

Position 4

The seat vacated by retiring Port Commission President Tom Albro was the most wide-open contest — there was no incumbent and it featured eight candidates.

The top two vote-getters in Tuesday night’s tally were former Seattle Councilmember Peter Steinbrueck, at 25.1 percent, and Preeti Shridhar, a public-affairs official for the city of Renton, with 20.9 percent.

Next up were attorney Richard Pope at 15.9 percent, small-business owner Ken Rogers at 15.6 percent and labor leader John Persak with 13.3 percent. Far behind were state worker Brooks Salazar (with 4.7 percent), Fernando Martinez, CEO of the Northwest Mountain Minority Supplier Development Council (2.5 percent) and retired master mariner Ray Armitstead (1.7 percent).