Cary Moon is headed with Jenny Durkan to the general election for Seattle mayor after a week of tallying ballots from the Aug. 1 primary election. A twist could be a potential recount.

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Cary Moon is headed with Jenny Durkan to the general election for Seattle mayor after a tense week of waiting for stray ballots from the Aug. 1 primary to be tallied.

Though Moon again lost ground to Nikkita Oliver in Tuesday’s returns, her lead over Oliver for second place and a spot in the Nov. 7 general election against Durkan is now greater than the expected number of remaining votes.

The urban-design activist’s advantage over the arts educator and attorney is 1,362 votes, down from 1,664 after Monday’s returns. There are only an estimated 1,200 Seattle votes still to be counted, King County Elections said Tuesday.

A twist could be a potential recount. Oliver can no longer catch up to Moon, but she might be able to force an automatic recount by continuing to gain ground.

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Machine recounts are mandatory when candidates are separated by fewer than 2,000 votes and also less than 0.5 percent of the total votes cast for both candidates.

Manual recounts are mandatory when the gap is fewer than 150 votes and also less than 0.25 percent of the total votes cast for both candidates.

Candidates also can request recounts.

Oliver has gained considerably on Moon since primary night, and both of them grabbed a greater share of the overall vote in the 21-candidate race.

Moon had 15.6 percent of the vote on election night, while Oliver had 13.9 percent. Now they have 17.6 percent and 16.9 percent, respectively. Oliver’s campaign has been helping people whose ballots have signature problems get their votes counted.

Moon has not claimed victory, nor has Oliver conceded. A spokesman for Oliver’s campaign said Tuesday the campaign would continue chasing ballots through Friday.

Durkan, the primary’s first-place finisher, has seen her share reduced with more ballots counted. The former U.S. attorney, who had 31.6 percent of the vote on election night, now has 28 percent.

The primary results will be certified Aug. 15. A potential recount would happen after that.