The property tax-funded levy has been renewed by voters five times since 1986. It funds a centralized fingerprint-identification system maintained by the King County Sheriff’s Office and used by regional law enforcement.

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Tuesday’s returns show voters approving a $126 million levy to further fund King County’s Automated Fingerprint Identification System (AFIS.)

King County elections returns showed the levy passing by a ratio of 56 percent to 44 percent.

2018 Primary Election

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The property tax-funded levy has been renewed by voters five times since 1986. It pays for a centralized fingerprint-identification system maintained by the King County Sheriff’s Office and used by regional law enforcement.

This six-year period, starting in 2019, will levy a property tax of 3.5 cents per $1,000 of a home’s value.

That’s a decrease from the 2018 rate of 4.15 cents, which was less than the initial 2013 rate of 5.92 cents. The decrease is due to higher property values.

Voters can see an estimate of how much the AFIS levy will cost them now compared to the previous six-year period using the King County Assessor’s online Tax Transparency Tool.

The AFIS program has 115 people on staff who go to crime scenes, process evidence, testify in court, maintain the network and interface and take prints at regional jails, according to the AFIS program manager, Carol Gillespie.

The Seattle Police Department’s Latent Print Unit is also funded by the levy. According to SPD, the system has helped solve or close 1,991 cases so far this year.

Find more live coverage of Tuesday’s election here.