Fain, who represents King County's 47th legislative District, last week conceded to Democratic challenger Mona Das. As of Wednesday evening, election results showed Das leading Fain by about 1.5 percentage points.

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OLYMPIA — An investigation commissioned by the Washington state Senate into the rape allegation against state Sen. Joe Fain, R-Auburn, will go forward despite his election loss.

A spokesman for the Senate Democrats Wednesday confirmed that the investigation — approved by the Senate Facilities and Operations Committee last week — is moving forward.

In a text message Wednesday, Senate Democratic Majority Leader Andy Billig of Spokane wrote that he has no plans to seek a reversal of that decision at the committee’s scheduled Thursday meeting.

Fain, who represents King County’s 47th legislative District, last week conceded to Democratic challenger Mona Das. As of Wednesday evening, election results showed Das leading Fain by about 1.5 percentage points.

In late September, Candace Faber tweeted that Fain raped her in 2007. Faber’s tweets came the same day as the U.S. Senate hearing over assault allegations against Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh.

Fain has denied the allegation and called for an investigation.

Faber — a former foreign-service officer who lives in Seattle and has worked for the city’s Information Technology Department — has said the rape happened in a hotel room in Washington, D.C., on the night she earned a master’s degree from Georgetown University.

Faber, along with legislators in both parties and Gov. Jay Inslee, also say they want an investigation.

Faber said Wednesday she welcomed the investigation but was frustrated it took this long.

“I have been waiting nearly seven weeks now for the word ‘investigation’ to mean something in the real world, and I am glad the Senate is finally taking this step,” Faber said in a Twitter exchange with a reporter. “I hope it prompts them to take more permanent actions to encourage survivors to come forward, especially those who are less likely to be believed or who have reasons to fear backlash.”

Lawmakers and state officials have struggled over who should conduct a review, since the legal jurisdiction of the alleged incident would be in Washington, D.C., and it purportedly took place before Fain was elected to the Legislature.

But last week, both Democratic and Republican lawmakers on the Senate’s Facilities and Operations Committee unanimously voted to commission an outside investigation.

Secretary of the Senate Brad Hendrickson said that he’s currently researching candidates for the job, and hopes to have a recommendation for Senate leadership next week.

Neither Fain nor Faber immediately responded Wednesday afternoon to requests for comment.

Staff reporter Heidi Groover contributed to this report, as did The Associated Press.