An online publication’s story about former Washington Gov. Gary Locke raises ethical questions about the private sale of Locke’s Washington-D.C.-area home to family members controlling a Chinese-owned company while Locke still served as U.S. ambassador to China.

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An online news publication’s story Wednesday about former Washington Gov. Gary Locke raises ethical questions about the private sale of Locke’s Washington, D.C.-area home to family members controlling a Chinese-owned company while Locke served as U.S. ambassador to China.

The story, reported by the online publication The Intercept as part of an investigative series on foreign influence in American politics, details how Locke arranged to sell his Bethesda, Md., home in 2013 to Wilson Chen, an executive with American Pacific International Capital (APIC), an international investment-holding company headquartered in San Francisco with business in the U.S. and China.

Locke sold the six-bedroom, five-bathroom home in September 2013 for $1.68 million to Chen’s sister, Huaidan Chen — a Chinese citizen and wife of Gordon Tang, a Chinese businessman based in Singapore who controls APIC, the news site reported.

Locke officially ended his Chinese ambassadorship five months later, in February 2014, then started a private consultancy firm in Seattle that works as an adviser to APIC.

“The revelation of a substantial financial transaction with prominent foreign citizens of the host country in which he was serving as a diplomat raises ethical concerns at home and may sully the modest image Locke projected abroad,” The Intercept reported in the story titled, “A Desperate Seller.”

Locke, who didn’t directly speak with Intercept reporters but provided emailed responses to some questions through his spokesman, disputed the story’s conclusions during an interview with The Seattle Times.

“I think they’re twisting the facts and drawing a lot of inferences,” Locke said. “They’re also leaving out a lot of information.”

Locke doesn’t dispute that he sold his home to Chen in the final months of his ambassadorship, but he noted he reported the sale as required in State Department disclosure reports.

He added that he sold the house for fair-market value, broke no ethics rules and provided no favoritism to APIC while he served as ambassador to China.

“As an ambassador, I did nothing on behalf of APIC, or advocate for APIC, to the Chinese government,” Locke said.

Read The Intercept’s full story here.