It’s the day after Election Day. Voting has ended. But votes are still being counted.

We’re posting live updates on candidates and results in Washington and across the U.S. National results have been rolling in since Tuesday afternoon, when polls began to close on the East Coast, and Washington state’s initial results arrived Tuesday evening. We’re expecting more news in the coming hours and days.

Here’s how Election Day unfolded in Washington state, and here are the results so far in key races.

What to know in Washington:

What to know across the U.S.:

Jump to: Seattle and Portland protests | Trump campaign sues states | Culp let go from police chief job | Strickland wins 10th Congressional District race

Live Updates:

‘Count every vote’: Protests over ballot tallies sweep through US cities

PORTLAND, Ore. — Calling on election officials to “count every vote,” protesters marched through the streets of several American cities Wednesday in response to President Donald Trump’s aggressive effort to challenge the vote count in Tuesday’s presidential election.

In Minneapolis, protesters blocked a freeway, prompting arrests. In Portland, hundreds gathered on the waterfront to protest the president’s attempted interventions in the vote count as a separate group protesting the police and urging racial justice surged through downtown, smashing shop windows and confronting police officers and National Guard troops.

In Phoenix, about 150 pro-Trump protesters, some of them armed, gathered outside the county recorder’s office where a closely watched count of votes that could help determine the outcome of the election was being conducted.

At several points, protesters contended that Adrian Fontes, the county official who oversees elections in Maricopa County, was improperly failing to count some ballots and costing Trump votes in Arizona’s most populous county — although there was no evidence that any ballots had been improperly tossed.

Early Thursday, former Vice President Joe Biden was only a handful of electoral votes from winning the election, and Trump’s campaign was mounting an aggressive legal effort to challenge the tally, filing lawsuits in Michigan, Georgia and Pennsylvania.

—The New York Times
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One taken to hospital after police arrest protesters on Capitol Hill

A woman was hospitalized after police moved into a group of protesters near the East Precinct on Capitol Hill and made arrests Wednesday night. Details about what happened and the person’s condition were vague Wednesday night.

Fire crews were “dispatched per request from SPD” and transported a woman who was about 30 years old and “who was in stable condition” to Harborview Medical Center, said Seattle Fire Department spokesperson David Cuerpo.

The group had marched through Capitol Hill as part of a nightly demonstration against police violence and racial injustice. By 11 p.m., police said they had made a total of six arrests throughout the night.

Earlier in the evening, a separate group of protesters had marched through Pioneer Square and downtown to call for accountability in the presidential election, while another group rallied at Westlake Park.

Read the full story here.

—Heidi Groover and Elise Takahama

Seattle police arrest 1 for alleged property damage on Capitol Hill

Seattle Police have arrested at least one person who they say was part of a protest group marching on Broadway on Capitol Hill.

A few minutes before police tweeted about the arrest, they said officers had issued warnings to the group to move out of the street near Broadway and East Mercer Street. The person was arrested for allegedly committing property damage, police said. The Seattle Times was not on scene to independently witness the event.

The group is continuing to march north on Broadway, police said.

Meanwhile, a demonstration that began at Occidental Park in Pioneer Square wrapped up just before 8 p.m. Another protest at Westlake Park in downtown Seattle has also since finished.

—Elise Takahama

Portland mayor declares win after tight contest

PORTLAND — The mayor of Portland, Oregon, declared victory Wednesday after a bruising campaign that sandwiched him between a tough challenger to his political left and anger from moderate voters and business owners frustrated with five months of near-nightly protests that made the city a frequent lightning rod for President Donald Trump.

Mayor Ted Wheeler said he had a clear mandate with more than 90% of the vote counted and was energized by his win. If his lead holds, Wheeler would become the first mayor to win a second term in the notoriously hard-to-govern city in 20 years. The Associated Press has not yet declared a winner.

Challenger Sarah Iannarone, who has never held an elected office, said late Tuesday that she was going to bed and urged her supporters to wait until every vote had been counted. She said Wednesday she would make a statement on social media later in the day but offered few details.

Write-in candidates won a whopping 13% of the vote. Supporters of Black Lives Matter activist Teressa Raiford, who didn’t make it past the primary, ran an unauthorized write-in campaign that helped account for the high number.

—Associated Press
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Wyman set to win third term in secretary of state race

OLYMPIA — Washington Secretary of State Kim Wyman was set to win her third term Wednesday, as she extended her lead over Democratic challenger Rep. Gael Tarleton of Seattle.

With King, Snohomish, Pierce, Spokane and other counties posting results by Wednesday evening, Wyman was getting 52.4% of the vote.

To take the lead, Tarleton, who has received 48% of the 3.4 million votes counted so far, would have to capture at least 70% of the estimated 450,000 votes still to be processed, according to an analysis by The Seattle Times.

First elected in 2012, Wyman has faced fierce challenges from Democrats who have been shut out of the secretary of state’s office since the mid-1960s.

Washington’s only other statewide elected Republican has not fared as well. State Treasurer Duane Davidson Wednesday was trailing his challenger, Rep. Mike Pellicciotti, D-Federal Way, 55% to 45%.

—Joseph O'Sullivan

Windows smashed at Portland businesses, protest disperses

Police declared a post-Election Day protest march through downtown Portland a riot Wednesday night, as some participants smashed windows of buildings during the early evening hours.

The march began with profanity-laced chants denouncing Portland Mayor Ted Wheeler, who has been a frequent target of their ire and was just elected to a second term.

Social media posts promoting the march expressed anger at downtown businesses that had supported Wheeler. Much of the vandalism took place along Burnside Street, and targets of the window-smashing included the windows in the venerable Roseland Theater that has struggled during the COVID-19 pandemic, and Saint André Bessette Church, which provides food for the homeless.

“I’ve walked past this place and seen them handing out sandwiches. It’s sad to see that," said a protester who was not involved in the property damage. 

A mix of Portland Police and State Troopers arrived, sirens blaring, as windows were being smashed. By 7:30 p.m., the protesters had largely dispersed.

—Hal Bernton

'We need to provide a united front,' protester at Westlake says

A crowd of about 75 had gathered at Westlake Park in downtown Seattle on Wednesday for a "Don't let Trump steal the election" rally promoted by local socialist groups.

Nobody in the crowd seemed particularly enthusiastic about Joe Biden. “The only difference between Republicans and Democrats is how aggressively they attack working people,” said Logan Swan, a member of Socialist Alternative. “Would you prefer to be slowly suffocated or set on fire?”

Another protester, who declined to give her name, for fear of being doxxed, said it would be “unseemly” to critique Biden today: “I think it’s important for us to be all-in, no matter how we feel inside — we need to provide a united front against whatever shenanigans are coming.”

—Brendan Kiley
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Historic voter turnout in King County climbs higher

King County's historic voter turnout is still growing.

According to a 6 p.m. update Wednesday, King County Elections had received and processed ballots from 85.7% of active registered voters, up from 84.8% at noon.

The county's record is 85%, set in 2012's general election. King County Elections won't officially declare that record broken until the results of Tuesday's election are certified Nov. 24. But this year's level of voter participation certainly appears unprecedented.

Seattle also is reaching new heights. According to the 6 p.m. update, officials had received and processed ballots from 87.9% of the city's active registered voters. Seattle's turnout was 86% in 2008, 86% in 2012 and 85% in 2016.

—Daniel Beekman

'This is what democracy looks like,' demonstrators chant as they begin march in Seattle

Protesters marched through downtown Seattle Wednesday. Organizers linked the fight to count votes in the presidential election to sustained protests for racial justice. (Lauren Frohne, Ramon Dompor and Corinne Chin / The Seattle Times)

At Occidental Park on Wednesday, community organizers linked the fight to count votes in the presidential election to protests for racial justice that have gone on for more than 100 days.

About 200 to 300 protesters had gathered at the park in Seattle's Pioneer Square. Before beginning to march and call out "This is what democracy looks like," young Black organizers gave speeches and held photos of people killed by police across the country.

Holding the stack of photos, Katie, an organizer for Morning March, said they were “just the beginning of a stack who have been murdered.” 

“They had their voice taken away,” said Katie, who does not provide her last name because of concerns about safety and doxxing, in an interview. “Did they want us to be silent? Did they want to vote this year? Yes. Can they? No. So that’s why we have to be out here.”

Speakers called for the demands protesters have made throughout the summer, including to cut money from the Seattle Police Department’s budget and redirect that money to Black communities and for Native sovereignty. 

Palmira Figueroa, another organizer of Wednesday’s event and a volunteer with the Washington Immigrant Solidarity Network, said she was not surprised by Tuesday’s close election. 

“I’ve been doing this work so long, I knew this country was racist.” But later results in Arizona offered some amount of comfort, Figueroa said. She had made calls, in English and Spanish, to voters there, urging them to exercise their right to vote and help remove President Donald Trump from office.

“That gave me hope,” Figueroa said.

—Heidi Groover

Buoyed by Oregon drug decriminalization vote, Washington groups propose similar plan

Voters in Oregon passed a landmark measure Tuesday making it the first state to decriminalize possession of small amounts of drugs including heroin, cocaine and methamphetamine.

And now, Washington could be next.

Critics of the nation’s war on drugs have launched a proposal similar to Oregon’s Measure 110, aimed for Washington’s 2021 legislative session. It would move the state away from arrests and jail for persons caught with small amounts of hard drugs.

Like the Oregon initiative, which passed overwhelmingly in the Nov. 3 election, the Washington proposal, known as the Treatment and Recovery Act, would decriminalize possession of small amounts of drugs deemed for personal use and substantially increase funding for treatment.

“We are so excited about the Oregon measure and what it means for Washington state,” said Christina Blocker, a spokeswoman for the Treatment First Washington campaign, during a virtual news conference on Wednesday.

Read the full story here.

—Jim Brunner
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Uber and Lyft win California contest to keep drivers as independent contractors

OAKLAND, Calif. — Drivers and other workers for so-called gig economy companies in California will not become their employees.

California voters carried Uber and Lyft to victory, overwhelmingly approving Proposition 22, a ballot measure that allows gig economy companies to continue treating drivers as independent contractors.

Uber, Lyft and the delivery service DoorDash designed the measure to exempt the companies from a state labor law that would have forced them to employ drivers and pay for health care, unemployment insurance and other benefits. As a concession to labor advocates, the initiative offers a wage floor and limited benefits to drivers.

The Associated Press projected early Wednesday that Prop. 22 had carried 58% of the vote. Prop. 22 faced the strongest opposition in San Francisco, where Uber and Lyft have their headquarters, with more than a 19-point deficit.

Read the full story here.

—New York Times

Washington's sex education mandate will begin next school year

Washington public schools will begin phasing in comprehensive sexual health education next school year after voters approved a referendum Tuesday that mandates the lessons.

Referendum 90 earned support from nearly 60% of voters as of Wednesday morning, and as a result, a 2020 law requiring lessons in grades K-12 will soon go into effect. The referendum garnered overwhelming support from King County voters and picked up a narrow lead in several other Western Washington counties. With the exception of Walla Walla and Whitman counties, voters on the eastern side of Washington largely rejected it.

Early Wednesday morning, the opposition campaign’s leader declined to acknowledge the outcome.  But by Wednesday afternoon, campaign chair Mindie Wirth conceded the race. “While there are still many votes to be counted, it looks like we will not be successful,” she said in a statement. “Nevertheless, I know that this powerful coalition will continue to hold Olympia accountable in the future.”

—Hannah Furfaro

'Protect the vote' protests underway in Seattle, Portland

Protests merging post-election politics with ongoing calls for racial justice were being held in Seattle on Wednesday evening, including in Occidental Square.

There, demonstrators gave speeches in front of lit signs that said "Count Every Vote" and "Protect Every Person."

Another group was gathering at Westlake Plaza.

Meanwhile, in Portland, a large group of demonstrators marched through downtown streets.

—Seattle Times staff
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COVID-19 cases exceed 100,000 a day for the first time, even as the nation is split

A worker wearing PPE walks along a line of cars at a coronavirus testing site in Auburn in late October. Virus experts have expressed concern about the nation’s growing number of infections as we approach winter. (Ted S. Warren / The Associated Press)
A worker wearing PPE walks along a line of cars at a coronavirus testing site in Auburn in late October. Virus experts have expressed concern about the nation’s growing number of infections as we approach winter. (Ted S. Warren / The Associated Press)

The coronavirus pandemic reached a dire milestone Wednesday when the number of new U.S. infections topped 100,000 a day for the first time, continuing a resurgence that showed no sign of slowing.

The record 104,004 cases was reached a day after the deeply divided nation went to the polls to choose between President Donald Trump and Democratic nominee Joe Biden, an election widely seen as a choice between fully reopening the economy and aggressively quelling the outbreak.

In Washington, state health officials reported 1,469 new coronavirus cases and 16 more deaths on Wednesday.

Read the full story here.

—Washington Post and Seattle Times staff

Schrier leads challenger Jensen in 8th Congressional District race

First-term Democratic Rep. Kim Schrier led Republican challenger Jesse Jensen 53% to 47% in the 8th Congressional District race on Wednesday. Schrier’s lead shrank by about 1 percentage point from Tuesday night’s counts.

The district has traditionally voted for congressional Republicans, but Schrier, an Issaquay pediatrician, won it in the Democratic wave of 2018. Jensen, a combat veteran and former Microsoft executive, had hoped to win it back, but the race attracted little attention from the national parties.

In August, Schrier received 43% of the primary vote — the lowest among the state’s congressional incumbents.

—David Gutman

Trump campaign sues Georgia

President Donald Trump’s campaign and the Georgia Republican Party have filed a lawsuit against the Chatham County Board of Elections asking a judge to order the county to secure and account for ballots received after 7 p.m. on Election Day.

State party chair David Shafer said in a statement Wednesday night that they planned to sue in a dozen counties.

The lawsuit alleges that a Republican observer watched a poll worker take unprocessed absentee ballots from a back room and mix them into processed absentee ballots waiting to be tabulated.

Georgia is among a handful of states that The Associated Press has not called.

—Associated Press
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Inslee says results give him a mandate to take on COVID-19

OLYMPIA — Washington Gov. Jay Inslee said Wednesday the election results give him a mandate to continue with a public-health-based approach to tamping down the COVID-19 outbreak.

Speaking in a news conference, Inslee contrasted his actions during the pandemic to Republican challenger Loren Culp, who had campaigned against virus restrictions, such as making people wear facial coverings to prevent the spread of the virus.

“So it is clear that people chose to continue with our scientifically based program,” said Inslee. “And I do believe that’s based on the success of the program.”

“I think voters were aware that other places were experiencing tremendous losses, hospitals that were full,” he said, adding later: “We have avoided that fate, and I think voters understood that we’ve had success because we’ve made decisions on a scientific basis.”

Inslee said he would make more remarks Thursday on the new coronavirus, which is spiking across the nation.

Voters this week elected Inslee to a rare third term. On Wednesday afternoon, the governor continued to lead Culp by nearly 20 points. Culp has not conceded the race, noting that there are ballots still arriving in the mail that will be counted in the coming days.

—Joseph O'Sullivan

Trump sues in Pennsylvania, Michigan; asks for Wis. recount

A crowd chanting ‘Stop the Count,’ look through the windows at the central counting board as police help keep additional challengers from entering due to overcrowding on Wednesday in Detroit. (Carlos Osorio / AP)
A crowd chanting ‘Stop the Count,’ look through the windows at the central counting board as police help keep additional challengers from entering due to overcrowding on Wednesday in Detroit. (Carlos Osorio / AP)

WASHINGTON — President Donald Trump’s campaign filed lawsuits Wednesday in Pennsylvania and Michigan, laying the groundwork for contesting the outcome in states that could determine whether he gets another four years in the White House.

The new filings, joining existing Republican legal challenges in Pennsylvania and Nevada, demand better access for campaign observers to locations where ballots are being processed and counted, the campaign said. However, at one Michigan location in question The Associated Press observed poll watchers from both sides monitoring on Wednesday.

The AP called Michigan for Democrat Joe Biden on Wednesday. Nevada and Pennsylvania are undecided.

The Trump campaign also is seeking to intervene in a Pennsylvania case at the Supreme Court that deals with whether ballots received up to three days after the election can be counted, deputy campaign manager Justin Clark said.

The actions reveal an emerging legal strategy that the president had signaled for weeks, namely that he would attack the integrity of the voting process in states where the result could mean his defeat.

Read the full story here.

—Associated Press

AP calls Michigan for Joe Biden

Joe Biden has won Michigan, according to The Associated Press.

The win gives him 16 electoral votes, bringing him to 264 votes, six short of the 270 he needs to defeat Donald Trump for president.

The AP called the race at 3 p.m. Pacific Standard Time.

—Paige Cornwell
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King County set to break record for voter turnout

King County is set to break its 85% record for voter turnout.

As of Wednesday afternoon, an estimated 86% of active registered voters had returned their ballots, King County Elections spokesperson Halei Watkins said. That tally included "ballots in house that haven't been run through processing yet for an exact count," Watkins said. In a more precise update at 12 p.m., King County Elections reported 84.8% turnout, with some ballots still trickling in.

The county's 85% record was set in 2012's general election, when incumbent President Barack Obama defeated Republican challenger Mitt Romney.

King County Elections won't officially declare this year's turnout a record until the results are certified on Nov. 24, spokesperson Halei Watkins said.

Seattle also could make history. The city clocked in with 85% turnout in 2016, 86% in 2012 and 86% in 2008. In Wednesday's 12 p.m. update, the city's reported turnout for Tuesday's election was 87%.

—Daniel Beekman

EXPLAINER: States still in play and what makes them that way

WASHINGTON — A handful of pivotal states remained in play Wednesday in the tightly contested U.S. presidential race. Here, The Associated Press reviews them and examines the reasons why they could still go to either Republican Donald Trump or Democrat Joe Biden:

GEORGIA: Outstanding ballots left to be counted in counties where Biden has performed well.

MICHIGAN: An estimated 4% of the vote remains to be counted in Michigan, much of it from the Democratic stronghold of Detroit. That makes the race between Trump and Biden too early too call.

NEVADA: The Associated Press has not yet declared a winner in the state of Nevada because it is too early to call the race there between President Donald Trump and Democratic nominee Joe Biden.

NORTH CAROLINA: Race too early to call, with fewer than 200,000 mail-in ballots left to count.

PENNSYLVANIA: More than 1 million votes left to be counted.

Read more about these battleground states here.

—Associated Press

Jittery public turns to liquor, news as race’s fate hangs

PHILADELPHIA (AP) — They clung to their cocktails and proclaimed themselves sick with dread. They relentlessly checked the news and went outdoors for fresh air. They bemoaned a wipeout wave that never came and held out hope their favored candidate would still eke out a win.

With the fate of the White House undecided Wednesday, a jittery and bitterly divided America braced for rocky days to come and the possibility a man they despise would be leading the nation.

“I can’t turn on the news. I don’t feel good at all,” said 61-year-old Tammy Lewandowski, a supporter of President Donald Trump in Milwaukee, where former Vice President Joe Biden emerged as the state’s winner. That’s an outcome Lewandowski fears will amount to a loss of law and order and rioting. “I feel like we lost our country. I don’t know that anything will be the same again.”

Just as troubled by what he was seeing, Jason Klemm, a 49-year-old actor in Philadelphia, sipped vodka from a 7-Eleven cup Wednesday morning in Rittenhouse Square, trying to ease his nerves after staying glued to television coverage until 4 a.m., then rising after a nap. As returns continued streaming in, Klemm felt more confident than he did a few hours earlier that his candidate, Biden, could prevail. But he knew the results would fall short of what he’d hoped for.

Read the full story here.

—Associated Press
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Biden speaks in Delaware

Culp says he was let go as Republic police chief

Gubernatorial candidate Loren Culp says he was let go as police chief of Republic, Ferry County, one day after he was defeated by Gov. Jay Inslee.

Culp, a Republican, said the Republic City Council voted to defund the Police Department, which is one person: Culp.

"Not even a letter of thank you," Culp said in a Facebook video. He added that he wasn't conceding the governor's race, though he was trailing by 20 percentage points in Tuesday's election results.

Read the full story here.

—Joseph O'Sullivan

As we await election results, health care hangs in the balance

With much still unclear the day after Election Day, the future of the nation’s health system remains uncertain.

Among the issues at stake is whether the federal government will play a stronger role in financing and setting the ground rules for health care coverage or cede more authority to states and the private sector.

But who controls Washington, D.C., is only part of the election’s impact on health policy. Several key health issues were on the ballot both directly and indirectly in many states.

Here's how the election results could affect various aspects of health care.

—Kaiser Health News
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North Carolina Republican Madison Cawthorn, 25, will be the youngest member of Congress

Madison Cawthorn, 25, will become the youngest member of Congress and the youngest Republican ever elected to the House. He kept the solidly conservative North Carolina seat in GOP hands after his race had become unexpectedly competitive when he was accused of sexual misconduct and racism. (Republican National Convention via The New York Times)
Madison Cawthorn, 25, will become the youngest member of Congress and the youngest Republican ever elected to the House. He kept the solidly conservative North Carolina seat in GOP hands after his race had become unexpectedly competitive when he was accused of sexual misconduct and racism. (Republican National Convention via The New York Times)

When Madison Cawthorn joins the North Carolina delegation in the House of Representatives in January, he will become the youngest member of Congress and the youngest Republican ever elected to the House.

The 25-year-old will also likely be a lightening rod for controversy. He has already drawn allegations of racism and positioned himself as highly conservative on issues ranging from abortion to racial justice. On Tuesday, after his decisive victory against Democratic challenger Moe Davis, Cawthorn may have set the tone for his first term in office, in the mold of President Donald Trump, by sending a tweet.

“Cry more, lib,” he wrote, just after the election results swung in his favor.

Cawthorn secured a surprise win in the June primary when he defeated Republican Lynda Bennett, who had been backed by Trump to replace former GOP congressman Mark Meadows after he left office to become the White House chief of staff.

Cawthorn won the seat representing North Carolina’s 11th District by more than 54,000 votes on Tuesday.

Read the full story here.

—Washington Post

Associated Press: Biden wins Wisconsin, Trump campaign requests recount

Joe Biden has won Wisconsin, according to The Associated Press.

The win gives Biden 10 electoral votes. AP called the race at 11:16 a.m. Pacific Standard Time.

President Donald Trump won Wisconsin in 2016. His campaign has requested a recount.

—Associated Press

Republican Sen. Collins wins reelection in Maine

Republican U.S. Sen. Susan Collins of Maine has won the hardest-fought race of her career, turning back a challenge by Democrat Sara Gideon and surviving to serve a fifth term.

Collins, one of four candidates on the ballot, won a majority of first-place votes. That meant no additional tabulation rounds were necessary under Maine’s ranked choice voting system.Gideon has conceded, telling supporters on Wednesday that she called Collins and congratulated her on the win.

Collins long touted herself in the fiercely independent state as a bipartisan centrist who’s willing to work with both parties to get things done.

But opponents accused her of being an enabler of President Donald Trump, citing her votes to confirm Supreme Court Justice Brett Kavanaugh and for tax cuts that critics said favored the rich.

—Associated Press
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Who voted and what matters to them, according to a massive survey

A Republican election challenger, at right, watches over election inspectors as they examine a ballot as votes are counted into the early morning hours Wednesday, Nov. 4, 2020, at the central counting board in Detroit. (AP Photo/David Goldman)
A Republican election challenger, at right, watches over election inspectors as they examine a ballot as votes are counted into the early morning hours Wednesday, Nov. 4, 2020, at the central counting board in Detroit. (AP Photo/David Goldman)

WASHINGTON — Four years of partisan discord and a tumultuous election have left U.S. voters deeply divided on everything from public health, racial justice and the economy to whether votes would be counted fairly, according to AP VoteCast, a national survey of the electorate.

Supporters of President Donald Trump and former Vice President Joe Biden found little common ground on the top crises facing the nation. But among the few shared views: Trump has changed the way things work in Washington. Most Trump voters say he has changed Washington for the better; most Biden voters say he’s changed it for the worse.

Here’s a snapshot of who voted and what matters to them.

—The Associated Press

Researchers: Social media users vulnerable to #stopthesteal misinformation

Twitter moved quickly Tuesday night and Wednesday to stop the spread of unsubstantiated claims by President Donald Trump about the election results and to label the posts as potentially misleading, while Facebook reminded users that votes are still being counted.

But as the results continue to swing away from Trump in some crucial states, attempts to ply social media users with misinformation are likely to ramp up, said Kate Starbird, co-founder of the University of Washington's Center for an Informed Public. Bad actors will mine voting data and Election Day anecdotes to advance that cause, she said.

Though foreign interference via social media didn't seem to be a major problem on Election Night, "we do perceive a vulnerability to foreign influence and disinformation" in the days ahead, Starbird said in a briefing by the Election Integrity Partnership, a coalition of U.S. researchers focused on mitigating efforts to delegitimize election results.

While no deadly or sustained violence erupted at polling sites Tuesday, "emerging conspiratorialism around vote counting" could drive unrest in the days ahead, said Emerson Brooking, a resident fellow at the Atlantic Council and a member of the Election Integrity Partnership.

For example, Marjorie Taylor Greene, a Georgia Republican who won a U.S. House seat Tuesday night and who is known for espousing QAnon conspiracy theories, posted a message on Twitter with the hashtag "#stopthesteal" (implying the election is being "stolen" despite no evidence of that), noted Graham Bookie, director of the Atlantic Council's Digital Forensic Research Lab.

Though extremists have not announced specific plans to engage in orchestrated election-related violence, conversations may be underway, Bookie said. "When we don't see extremist groups talking in public" on social media, he said, "it means they're talking in private."

—Daniel Beekman

Georgia Republican who supports QAnon wins US House seat

Republican Marjorie Taylor Greene, who expressed racist views and support for QAnon conspiracy theories in a series of online videos, has won a U.S. House seat representing northwest Georgia.

Her candidacy was bolstered by President Donald Trump, who has called her a “future Republican Star.”

Greene was heavily favored in the conservative district even before Democratic challenger Kevin Van Ausdal suddenly dropped out in September, saying he was moving out of state.

Marjorie Taylor Greene, center, stands for the Pledge of Allegiance during a rally at the Northwest Georgia Amphitheatre in September in Ringgold, Ga. The Republican, who expressed racist views and support for QAnon conspiracy theories in a series of online videos, has won a U.S. House seat representing northwest Georgia. (C.B. Schmelter/Chattanooga Times Free Press via AP)
Marjorie Taylor Greene, center, stands for the Pledge of Allegiance during a rally at the Northwest Georgia Amphitheatre in September in Ringgold, Ga. The Republican, who expressed racist views and support for QAnon conspiracy theories in a series of online videos, has won a U.S. House seat representing northwest Georgia. (C.B. Schmelter/Chattanooga Times Free Press via AP)

Greene is a businesswoman and political newcomer who’s gained large followings on social media in part by posting incendiary videos and comments.

Greene has claimed in online videos that Black and Hispanic men are being held back by “gangs and dealing drugs,” alleged an “Islamic invasion” of government offices and accused Jewish billionaire George Soros of collaborating with Nazis.

Read the story here.

—Ben Nadler, The Associated Press
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Marilyn Strickland wins Washington's 10th Congressional District, Associated Press says

Marilyn Strickland, the former mayor of Tacoma and CEO of the Seattle Metropolitan Chamber of Commerce, will be Washington’s newest member of Congress. (Ted S. Warren / The Associated Press)
Marilyn Strickland, the former mayor of Tacoma and CEO of the Seattle Metropolitan Chamber of Commerce, will be Washington’s newest member of Congress. (Ted S. Warren / The Associated Press)

Marilyn Strickland, the former mayor of Tacoma and CEO of the Seattle Metropolitan Chamber of Commerce, has won the open congressional race in Washington's 10th Congressional District, according to the Associated Press.

The AP called the race for Strickland, in a district representing Olympia, Lakewood, Puyallup, eastern Tacoma and Joint Base Lewis-McChord, at 8 a.m. Wednesday morning.

Strickland, a Democrat, led with 50% of the vote, to about 36% for state Rep. Beth Doglio, also a Democrat. About 14% of voters had cast their ballots for write-in candidates, a large percentage, but not wholly surprising in a race with no Republican option.

Strickland will replace Rep. Denny Heck, a Democrat who has represented the 10th District since its creation, after the 2010 Census. Heck announced his retirement late last year and ran for lieutenant governor, a race he won.

"Thank you - to the voters of the 10th district for helping us make history last night, and to our supporters who have been with us on this journey," Strickland wrote on Twitter Wednesday morning. "I am humbled by these results, and I look forward to working for our communities everyday in Congress. Let's get to work!"

Doglio, on Wednesday, thanked supporters for helping her bring "progressive values into the conversation."

"This wasn’t the result we hoped for, but I want to thank you from the bottom of my heart for everything you did to support this campaign," she wrote on Twitter. "At every campaign debate - we talked about climate change, Medicare for all, the Green New Deal. So many progressive policies, that are more than just progressive -- they are common sense."

Strickland, who was born in Seoul, South Korea, will become both the first Black member of Congress from Washington and the first Korean American congresswoman anywhere in America.

The race mirrored the nationwide, intra-party Democratic struggles that have played out over the last two presidential primaries. Establishment liberals lined up behind the business-friendly Strickland, while progressives supported Doglio, a longtime environmental activists, who championed expansive policies such as Medicare for All and a Green New Deal.

And, like in the last two Democratic presidential primaries, the more moderate candidate prevailed.

For results in Washington's other congressional races, where all incumbents were leading, click here.

—David Gutman

What’s left in the seven states that will decide the presidential race

Workers count mail and absentee ballots at the Central Count Facility in Milwaukee, Wis., on Tuesday. Joe Biden is projected to win Wisconsin and its 10 electoral votes. (Chang W. Lee / The New York Times)
Workers count mail and absentee ballots at the Central Count Facility in Milwaukee, Wis., on Tuesday. Joe Biden is projected to win Wisconsin and its 10 electoral votes. (Chang W. Lee / The New York Times)

There are still seven states left undecided in the presidential race: Wisconsin, Nevada, Arizona, Michigan, Pennsylvania, Georgia and North Carolina.

Here’s where each of them stands Wednesday morning.

—The New York Times

Connecticut election worker tests positive for coronavirus

An election employee in New Haven, Connecticut, has tested positive for the coronavirus, leading to a dozen other workers being quarantined, city officials said Wednesday.

Maritza Bond, the city’s public health director, said the infected employee has not been to work since experiencing symptoms last week. She said offices in City Hall have been disinfected.

The 12 people placed in quarantine were temporary employees who spent Tuesday in the city clerk’s office counting absentee ballots and had no known contact with voters. Everyone was wearing masks and taking other precautions, Bond said.

Gage Frank, a spokesman for Mayor Justin Elicker, said it didn’t appear vote counting was affected.

Read the story here.

—The Associated Press
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Dems head toward House control, but lose incumbents to GOP

WASHINGTON — Disappointed Democrats drove Wednesday toward extending their control of the House for two more years but with a potentially shrunken majority as they lost at least seven incumbents and failed to oust any Republican lawmakers in initial returns.

By midmorning Wednesday, Democrats’ only gains were two North Carolina seats vacated by GOP incumbents after a court-ordered remapping made the districts more Democratic.

Though they seemed likely to retain House control, Democrats' performance was an unexpected disappointment for the party, which hoped for modest gains of perhaps 15 seats.

Speaker of the House Nancy Pelosi, D-Calif., talks to reporters about Election Day results in races for the House of Representatives, at Democratic National Committee headquarters in Washington D.C., Tuesday, Nov. 3, 2020. She was joined on a video call by Rep. Cheri Bustos, D-Ill., chairwoman of the Democratic Congressional Campaign Committee. (Alyssa Schukar/The New York Times via AP, Pool)
Speaker of the House Nancy Pelosi, D-Calif., talks to reporters about Election Day results in races for the House of Representatives, at Democratic National Committee headquarters in Washington D.C., Tuesday, Nov. 3, 2020. She was joined on a video call by Rep. Cheri Bustos, D-Ill., chairwoman of the Democratic Congressional Campaign Committee. (Alyssa Schukar/The New York Times via AP, Pool)

Read the full story here.

—The Associated Press

Watch live as more votes are counted in key states

—The Washington Post

Trump’s road to the Supreme Court won’t be as quick as he wants

President Donald Trump said he will go to the U.S. Supreme Court because he wants “all voting to stop,” as he tries to hold on to early election leads in key battleground states. But the voting is over. It’s only counting that is taking place across the nation. (Alyssa Schukarv / The New York Times)
President Donald Trump said he will go to the U.S. Supreme Court because he wants “all voting to stop,” as he tries to hold on to early election leads in key battleground states. But the voting is over. It’s only counting that is taking place across the nation. (Alyssa Schukarv / The New York Times)

President Donald Trump said he will go to the U.S. Supreme Court because he wants “all voting to stop” — a misleading statement, as voting has stopped and only counting remains — as he tries to hold on to early election leads in key battleground states.

He won’t be able to go to the nation’s highest court immediately.

Cases typically work their way there after a ruling by a local judge and then other appeals courts. In 2000, it took more than a month before the Supreme Court issued the landmark Bush v. Gore ruling that ultimately decided that year’s election.

Read the full story here.

—Bloomberg

Presidency hinges on tight races in battleground states

Democratic presidential candidate former Vice President Joe Biden and wife Dr. Jill Biden greet supporters early Wednesday, Nov. 4, 2020, in Wilmington, Del. (AP Photo/Paul Sancya)
Democratic presidential candidate former Vice President Joe Biden and wife Dr. Jill Biden greet supporters early Wednesday, Nov. 4, 2020, in Wilmington, Del. (AP Photo/Paul Sancya)

WASHINGTON — The fate of the United States presidency hung in the balance Wednesday morning, as President Donald Trump and Democratic challenger Joe Biden battled for three familiar battleground states — Wisconsin, Michigan and Pennsylvania — that could prove crucial in determining who wins the White House.

It was unclear when or how quickly a winner could be determined.

A late burst of votes in Michigan and Wisconsin gave Biden a small lead in those states, but it was still too early to call the race. Hundreds of thousands of votes were also outstanding in Pennsylvania.

Read the full story here.

—The Associated Press

After a night of red and blue mirages, TV anchors and pundits push back on Trump’s false claim of election victory

On an election night that ended in uncertainty, the only thing TV anchors and pundits seemed to know for sure was that President Donald Trump was wrong, very wrong, in declaring that he had won.

“What President Trump just said is undemocratic and false and premature,” CNN anchor Jake Tapper said moments after Trump falsely claimed victory in states where ballots were still being tallied and that further counting constituted “a fraud on the American people.” Said Tapper flatly: “It is not accurate to say he won.”

CNN’s White House reporter Jim Acosta said “the Founding Fathers are rolling in their graves” over an American president “delegitimizing” the results of an election.

On Fox News, anchor-host Dana Perino quoted a tweet by conservative commentator Ben Shapiro: “No, Trump has not already won the election, and it is deeply irresponsible for him to say he has.”

Read the full story here.

—The Washington Post

Either presidential candidate could still win. Here are their possible paths to victory.

Japanese and U.S. flags are placed in front of a TV monitor showing a news program broadcasting live on the U.S. presidential election between President Donald Trump, right, and former Vice President Joe Biden, left, at a foreign exchange dealing company Wednesday in Tokyo. (AP Photo/Eugene Hoshiko)
Japanese and U.S. flags are placed in front of a TV monitor showing a news program broadcasting live on the U.S. presidential election between President Donald Trump, right, and former Vice President Joe Biden, left, at a foreign exchange dealing company Wednesday in Tokyo. (AP Photo/Eugene Hoshiko)

Joe Biden started election night with many paths to 270 electoral votes, but by Wednesday morning President Donald Trump had won Florida, Ohio and Texas and was within striking distance of winning North Carolina.

That left a diminished but still significant number of ways by which Biden could prevail, mostly clustered around recapturing Michigan, Wisconsin and Pennsylvania, the once-reliable “blue wall” states that Trump toppled four years ago.

Here are the top scenarios remaining for Biden or Trump to win the 2020 election.

—The New York Times

World waits nervously, impatiently for U.S. vote count

A man watches a TV screen at the Seoul Railway Station in Seoul, South Korea, showing the images of U.S. President Donald Trump and Democratic presidential candidate former Vice President Joe Biden during a news program about the U.S. presidential election on Wednesday, Nov. 4, 2020. (AP Photo/Lee Jin-man)
A man watches a TV screen at the Seoul Railway Station in Seoul, South Korea, showing the images of U.S. President Donald Trump and Democratic presidential candidate former Vice President Joe Biden during a news program about the U.S. presidential election on Wednesday, Nov. 4, 2020. (AP Photo/Lee Jin-man)

From Ford Model T cars that popped off the assembly line in just 90 minutes to 60-second service for burgers, the United States has had a major hand in making the world a frenetic and impatient place, primed and hungry for instant gratification.

So waking up to the news Wednesday that the winner of the U.S. election might not be known for hours, days or longer — pundits filled global airwaves with their best bets — was jarring for a planet weaned on that most American of exports: speed.

In the absence of an immediate winner between President Donald Trump and challenger Joe Biden, the guessing game of trying to figure out which of them would end up in the White House, and how, quickly turned global. Government leaders scrambled to digest the delay and ordinary people swapped views, hopes and fears on feeds and phones.

Read the full story here.

—The Associated Press

Oregon decriminalizes heroin and cocaine, as 4 other states legalize recreational pot

A truck drives past a sign supporting a ballot measure that would legalize controlled, therapeutic use of psilocybin mushrooms last month in Salem, Ore.  (AP Photo/Andrew Selsky)
A truck drives past a sign supporting a ballot measure that would legalize controlled, therapeutic use of psilocybin mushrooms last month in Salem, Ore. (AP Photo/Andrew Selsky)

Oregon voters on Tuesday overwhelmingly passed a measure to decriminalize the possession of street drugs, becoming the first state to embrace a plan billed as a way to drastically narrow drug arrests.

The result was one of many noteworthy wins for advocates seeking to change drug laws. Oregon also legalized psychedelic mushrooms, which were decriminalized in Washington D.C. as well. New Jersey, Arizona, Montana and South Dakota each voted to legalize recreational marijuana, joining 11 other states, plus D.C., which have already done so, and Mississippi legalized it for medical use.

The passage of Oregon’s Measure 110 means the state’s residents will no longer face arrests or prison sentences for carrying small amounts of drugs like cocaine, heroin, oxycontin and methamphetamine. The measure, which passed by almost 60%, also lays out a groundwork for addicts to receive treatment as opposed to jail time.

Read the full story here.

—The Washington Post

Trump seeks to stop ‘all voting,’ but voting has already stopped. Only counting remains.

Marian Collin Franco, 20, helps collect provisional ballots at the Erie County Courthouse on Tuesday in Erie, Pa. (Greg Wohlford / Erie Times-News via AP)
Marian Collin Franco, 20, helps collect provisional ballots at the Erie County Courthouse on Tuesday in Erie, Pa. (Greg Wohlford / Erie Times-News via AP)

WASHINGTON — President Donald Trump says he’ll take the presidential election to the Supreme Court, but it’s unclear what he means in a country in which vote tabulations routinely continue beyond Election Day, and states largely set the rules for when the count has to end.

“We’ll be going to the U.S. Supreme Court — we want all voting to stop,” Trump said early Wednesday.

But the voting is over. It’s only counting that is taking place across the nation. No state will count absentee votes that are postmarked after Election Day.

Democratic challenger Joe Biden’s campaign called Trump’s statement “outrageous, unprecedented, and incorrect.”

Read the full story here.

—The Associated Press

Catch up on the past 24 hours

Joe Biden and Donald Trump
Joe Biden and Donald Trump

Fierce battles are still unfolding in crucial states, and neither Trump nor Joe Biden last night had the 270 Electoral College votes needed to win the presidency. Trump, in an early morning appearance today at the White House, made premature claims of victories in several key states and said he would take the election to the Supreme Court.

In Washington, women rejected Trump in big numbers, columnist Danny Westneat writes.

The battle for control of the U.S. Senate is close, while the House is expected to remain in Democrats' hands. In Washington's 10th District, Marilyn Strickland leads Beth Doglio; here's how the other congressional races are shaking out.

An anxious Seattle is agonizing and struggling to stay patient. Here's a glance at last night's returns, with ballots still to be counted.

Demonstrators returned to Seattle streets, with larger crowds spurred by the momentum of election night but still focused on demands that they’ve called for all summer: racial justice and an end to police brutality. Meanwhile, scattered protests took place across the country — including near the White House — but there were no signs of serious violence or widespread unrest.

Gov. Jay Inslee thanks the voters of Washington state after winning his third term, Tuesday, Nov. 3, 2020 in Olympia Wash. (Steve Bloom/The Olympian via AP)
Gov. Jay Inslee thanks the voters of Washington state after winning his third term, Tuesday, Nov. 3, 2020 in Olympia Wash. (Steve Bloom/The Olympian via AP)

Gov. Jay Inslee has been re-elected to a third term, saying, "I haven't been this excited since I first operated a bulldozer."

Where things stand with other local races:

And local ballot measures:

—Seattle Times staff