A pedestrian who was struck by a Ride the Duck amphibious vehicle on Tuesday afternoon in downtown Seattle was crossing against the signal when he was hit, according to Seattle police.

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A pedestrian who was struck by a Ride the Ducks amphibious vehicle on Tuesday afternoon in downtown Seattle was crossing against the light when he was hit, according to Seattle police.

Police say the man was crossing at Second Avenue and Pike Street when he was struck by the sightseeing vehicle shortly after 1 p.m. The man, reported to be in his 30s, suffered minor injuries but was taken to the hospital by ambulance as a precautionary measure, according to the Seattle Fire Department.

The accident was witnessed by two police officers,  according to Seattle police spokesman Sgt. Sean Whitcomb.

Brian Tracy, the chief executive of Ride the Ducks, which offers tours through Seattle in amphibious vehicles, said, “Thank God our captain is as good of a driver as he is. He was able to keep from really hurting him bad.”

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Police said the pedestrian was northbound on Second when he crossed Pike against the signal and was hit by the Duck.

“Even though it wasn’t our fault, we feel really bad,” said Tracy. “Safety is the number one priority in our company, and we take it really serious.”

Ride the Duck was sued three years ago by a motorcyclist who claimed he had been stopped at a red light at Third Avenue and Pike Street in October 2011, when he was was run over and dragged by one of the tourist vehicles.

The company was involved in two other collisions in recent years, in December 2010 and June 2011, when different Duck drivers rear-ended passenger vehicles at Third Avenue and Pike Street and at Aurora Avenue North and Denny Way. No one was injured, but both Duck drivers told officers they didn’t see the cars because of the height of their own vehicles, according to the collision reports.

Tracy said the vehicles now have “cameras and mirrors all over the Ducks, and the drivers are required to take a safety class once a month. We take this really serious.”

The Duck name is derived from the designation DUKW, derived from six-wheeled vehicles used as landing craft by the U.S. military during World War II. They were designed to deliver cargo from ships at sea directly to shore, according to the company’s website.