Bill Withers, 81, who wrote and sang a string of soulful songs in the 1970s that have stood the test of time, including “ Lean on Me, ” “Lovely Day” and “Ain’t No Sunshine,” has died from heart complications, died on Monday in Los Angeles.

The death of the three-time Grammy Award winner comes as the public has drawn inspiration from his music during the coronavirus pandemic, with health care workers, choirs, artists and more posting their own renditions on “Lean on Me” to help get through the difficult times. “Lean on Me,” a paean to friendship, was performed at the inaugurations of both Barack Obama and Bill Clinton. “Ain’t No Sunshine” and “Lean on Me” are among Rolling Stone’s list of the 500 Greatest Songs of All Time.

Ellis Marsalis Jr., 85, jazz pianist, teacher and patriarch of a musical clan that includes famed sons Wynton, Branford, Delfeayo and Jason, died Wednesday in New Orleans after battling pneumonia brought on by the new coronavirus. Four of his six sons are musicians: Wynton, the trumpeter, is America’s most prominent jazz spokesman as artistic director of Jazz at Lincoln Center in New York. Harry Connick Jr. was one of Mr. Marsalis’ students; others included trumpeters Nicholas Payton and Terence Blanchard, saxophonists Donald Harrison and Victor Goines, and bassist Reginald Veal.

Adam Schlesinger, 51, Emmy- and Grammy-winning musician and songwriter known for his work with his band Fountains of Wayne and on the TV show “Crazy Ex-Girlfriend,” died Wednesday at a New York state hospital after contracting the coronavirus. He had been sedated and on a ventilator for several days. He was nominated for an Academy Award for writing the title song for the 1997 movie “That Thing You Do,” written and directed by Tom Hanks.

Wallace Roney, 59, virtuoso trumpeter whose term as Miles Davis’ only true protégé opened onto a prominent career in jazz, died from complications of the coronavirus Tuesday in Paterson, New Jersey. By the time he linked up with Davis, Mr. Roney was already a leading voice in what came to be called the Young Lions movement, a coterie of young musicians devoted to bringing jazz back into line with its midcentury sound.

Bill Withers, 81, who wrote and sang a string of soulful songs in the 1970s that have stood the test of time, including “ Lean on Me, ” “Lovely Day” and “Ain’t No Sunshine,” has died from heart complications, died on Monday in Los Angeles.

The death of the three-time Grammy Award winner comes as the public has drawn inspiration from his music during the coronavirus pandemic, with health care workers, choirs, artists and more posting their own renditions on “Lean on Me” to help get through the difficult times. “Lean on Me,” a paean to friendship, was performed at the inaugurations of both Barack Obama and Bill Clinton. “Ain’t No Sunshine” and “Lean on Me” are among Rolling Stone’s list of the 500 Greatest Songs of All Time.

Joe Clark, 78, a local aviation pioneer who was the man most responsible for those elegant upswept wingtips now standard on new Boeing 737s — a now-ubiquitous winglet technology, installed to increase range and save fuel on business jets as well as commercial airplanes — died Monday at a hospital near Palm Springs, California, where he had a home. He had been flying the previous Saturday in his two-seater GameBird aerobatic airplane, and a couple of hours after landing, he fell backward and hit his head, causing bleeding on the brain. He never regained consciousness.

James T. Goodrich, 73, pediatric neurosurgeon known for successfully separating conjoined twins in a complicated and rare procedure, died from complications of the coronavirus Monday at Albert Einstein College of Medicine and Montefiore Medical Center in New York.

Goodrich was thrust into public view when he conducted a series of four operations over nearly a year on Clarence and Carl Aguirre, twins from the Philippines who were joined at the tops of their heads and shared major veins in their brains. He led a team of surgeons at Montefiore’s Children’s Hospital, and the twins’ story generated headlines. The twins, who will turn 18 this month, live with their mother in Scarsdale, New York.

Tomie dePaola, 85, the prolific children’s author and illustrator who delighted generations with tales of Strega Nona, the kindly and helpful old witch in Italy, died Monday at the Dartmouth-Hitchcock Medical Center in Lebanon, New Hampshire, of complications following surgery after being badly injured in a fall last week.

Strega Nona, his most endearing character, originated as a doodle at a dull faculty meeting at Colby Sawyer College in New London, New Hampshire, where dePaola was a member of the theater department. The first tale was based on one of his favorite stories as a child, about a pot that keeps producing porridge. “Strega Nona: An Original Tale,” which came out in 1975, was a Caldecott finalist for best illustrated work. Other books in the series include “Strega Nona’s Magic Lessons” and “Strega Nona Meets Her Match.”

He worked on over 270 books in more than half a century of publishing, and nearly 25 million copies have been sold worldwide and his books have been translated into more than 20 languages.

Philip W. Anderson, 96, an American physicist whose explorations of electronic behavior in solid materials like glass, crystals and alloys led him to share the 1977 Nobel Prize in physics and deepened science’s understanding of magnetism, superconductivity and the structure of matter, died March 29 in Princeton, New Jersey.

Alan Merrill, 69, who co-wrote Joan Jett’s signature hit “I Love Rock N’ Roll,” died of coronavirus March 29 in New York, his daughter announced on social media.

The Bronx native wrote “I Love Rock N’ Roll” with bandmate Jake Hooker when they were in The Arrows in 1975. Rock star Joan Jett saw him perform the iconic song on a British TV show the following year and she ended up recording her own version, which became an instant hit that helped define an era and was the No. 1 song in the U.S. for eight weeks in 1982. The rock anthem has since been recorded by Britney Spears and many other artists.

Krzysztof Penderecki, 86, a composer and conductor whose music evoked religious wonder, apocalyptic terror and the tumultuous history of his native Poland with an intensity that made him a favorite of rock musicians and filmmakers, died March 29 in Krakow, Poland.

His choral and orchestral works featured quarter tones, indeterminate pitches, rapid glissandi and eerie knocks, shrieks, whistles and sirens. Penderecki’s otherworldly sounds cropped up in moody dramas and horror films, including in William Friedkin’s “The Exorcist” (1973), Stanley Kubrick’s “The Shining” (1980), Alfonso Cuarón’s “Children of Men” (2006) and Martin Scorsese’s “Shutter Island” (2010).

Joe Diffie, 61, a country music star who won Country Music Association and Grammy awards and had more than 20 top-10 hits including “Home,” “If the Devil Danced (in Empty Pockets),” “Third Rock From the Sun,” “John Deere Green” and “Pickup Man,” died March 29 from complications of COVID-19.

Tom Coburn, 72, the former Republican U.S. senator, an Oklahoma family doctor who earned a reputation as a conservative political maverick as he railed against federal earmarks and subsidies for the rich, died March 28, in Tulsa. Coburn was diagnosed with prostate cancer years earlier.

Known for bluntly speaking his mind, Coburn frequently criticized the growth of the federal deficit and what he said was excessive government spending. Frustrated legislators called him “Dr. No,” for his maneuver to use rule-book technicalities to block several bills. Coburn also delivered more than 4,000 babies while an obstetrician in Muskogee, where he treated patients for free while in the Senate.

Jan Howard, 90, pioneer in country music who wrote and sang about heartache and experienced it herself, died March 28 of pneumonia at home in Gallatin, Tennessee, near Nashville. She broke into country music at a time few women — Kitty Wells, Patsy Cline and Loretta Lynn among them — were consistently placing singles on the charts. Among her most successful recordings were her four Top 10 duets with singer-songwriter Bill Anderson. “For Loving You,” a sentimental recitation, rose to No. 1 on the Billboard country chart in 1967. One of her best-known solo hits was“Evil on Your Mind.”

David Schramm, 73, stage actor who portrayed King Lear in his early 30s and appeared in more than a dozen Broadway plays but was best known for his role as the blustery, unscrupulous owner of a small airline on the TV sitcom “Wings,” died March 28 of a heart attack at home in the Bronx, in New York.

John Murray, 92, internationally recognized expert in pulmonology, helped the medical world understand a deadly condition known as acute respiratory distress syndrome. He died March 24 of the condition he helped define. The University of California, San Francisco, School of Medicine, where Dr. Murray was a professor emeritus, said the cause of death, “sadly and ironically,” was respiratory failure resulting from acute respiratory distress syndrome caused by the novel coronavirus.

He lived in Paris for much of the year with his wife, novelist Diane Johnson. Much of his best-known research focused on pulmonary disease and AIDS, which he encountered at San Francisco General in 1981, and on defining acute respiratory distress syndrome.

Gerald Freedman, 92, who directed countless plays, operas and musicals, including the original “Hair” in 1967 and more than a dozen Broadway productions, and who influenced generations of actors in 21 years as dean of the drama school at the University of North Carolina School of the Arts, died of kidney failure March 17 at home in Winston-Salem, North Carolina.

He was a trusted assistant to Jerome Robbins when Robbins was directing the Broadway hits “Bells Are Ringing,” “West Side Story,” and “Gypsy” in the 1950s. He worked closely with Joseph Papp for years, serving as artistic director of Papp’s New York Shakespeare Festival and inaugurating the performance space now known as the Public Theater with “Hair.”