SALEM, Ore. (AP) — The rate of positive coronavirus tests in Oregon dropped to 4.4%, the lowest it has been in two months, officials from the state’s health authority said Wednesday.

The weekly amount of cases in Oregon also continued to decline, decreasing 8.6 percent from the previous week.

The Oregon Health Authority reported three new COVID-19 related deaths and 140 new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases Wednesday, bringing the state total to 27,075. The state’s death toll is 468.

The age group with the highest incidence of reported infection remains 20 to 29 years old.

On Tuesday, Gov. Kate Brown announced that she was extending her declaration of state of emergency for an additional 60 days ahead of Labor Day weekend. The declaration is the legal underpinning for the executive orders the governor has issued, including her orders surrounding reopening Oregon, childcare, schools and higher education operations. Extending the state of emergency declaration allows those orders to stay in effect.

The governor also urged Oregonians to continue to follow coronavirus safety regulations during the holiday weekend, warning that celebrations could “sow the seeds of COVID-19 outbreaks” and could “set us back for months.”

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“Small social get-togethers like barbecues and family celebrations have fueled wider community outbreaks in counties across Oregon,.” Brown said. “This weekend, you have a choice. Please, stay local this Labor Day, and practice safe COVID-19 habits. Wear a face covering, watch your physical distance, and wash your hands.

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Cline is a corps member for the Associated Press/Report for America Statehouse News Initiative. Report for America is a nonprofit national service program that places journalists in local newsrooms to report on undercovered issues. ___

Cline is a corps member for the Associated Press/Report for America Statehouse News Initiative. Report for America is a nonprofit national service program that places journalists in local newsrooms to report on undercovered issues.